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Topic: Is it true that sulfide is oxidized to sulfate while H2S is oxidized to S8?  (Read 4313 times)

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Offline Mr. Raru

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Is it true that sulfide is oxidized to sulfate while H2S is oxidized to S8? Why is this so when both have an oxidation number of 2 to begin with?
« Last Edit: December 28, 2005, 09:37:58 PM by Mitch »

Offline Mitch

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In what reaction?
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
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Offline Mr. Raru

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A solution of copper(II) sulfide is oxidized by dilute nitric acid.

Offline Alberto_Kravina

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Hmmm...solution of copper sulfide? copper sulfide has apretty low solubility product (Ksp(CuS) = 1.3×10-3 6)
Sulfide is partially oxidized to sulfate with dil. nitric acid.

H2S is oxidized to S8 with oxygen:

8 H2S + 4 O2 ----> S8 + 8 H2O

Quote
Why is this so when both have an oxidation number of 2 to begin with?
I don't know if I understood the question, but I think that it depends on the strength of the oxidation agent.

« Last Edit: December 31, 2005, 12:34:09 PM by Alberto_Kravina »

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