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Topic: Energy vs. Mass  (Read 4881 times)

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Offline Gxb217

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Energy vs. Mass
« on: November 11, 2012, 09:38:01 PM »
If energy is directly related to mass through E=MC^2, then how can an electron or particle gain energy without an increase in mass?

Does it has to do with the kinetic versus potential energy?

Offline ATMyller

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Re: Energy vs. Mass
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2012, 02:50:11 AM »
Mass is not the only form of energy. A particle can gain energy by other means than just mass increase.
Chemists do it periodically on table.

Offline Borek

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Re: Energy vs. Mass
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2012, 04:10:58 AM »
If energy is directly related to mass through E=MC^2, then how can an electron or particle gain energy without an increase in mass?

Rest (or invariant) mass is constant. Relativistic mass is the one that gets larger when the particle gains speed. So yes, fast particles are heavier.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2012, 04:32:14 AM by Borek »
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Offline Gxb217

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Re: Energy vs. Mass
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2012, 10:26:55 PM »
Borek,
Thank you very much. I was able to make the connection between this and kinetic energy in physics and that solved my questions

Gxb217

Offline Enthalpy

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Re: Energy vs. Mass
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2012, 08:17:20 AM »
Any form of energy gain results in a mass increase. Not only for particles.
But only concentrated forms of energy make a substantial variation that is perceivable or numerically usable: strong force, nuclear electrostatic repulsion, relativistic speed...

Offline lucerosoliz

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Re: Energy vs. Mass
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2012, 06:45:08 AM »
Mass–energy equivalence states that any object has a certain energy, even when it is stationary.

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