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Topic: Reaction A+B ->C  (Read 4807 times)

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Tom

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Reaction A+B ->C
« on: June 18, 2004, 04:29:08 PM »
a reaction A + B -> C is second order in A and first order in B, what will cause the rate to increase by a factor of 42?

double (A) and keep (B) constant is what I concluded, any other opinions?

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Reaction A+B ->C
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2004, 11:54:50 AM »
Your suggestion suggest that the rate equation is defined as:
reaction rate = k[A]2

You are right, if the factor is 4, not 42.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Tom

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Re:Reaction A+B ->C
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2004, 09:03:26 AM »
What if I were to double (A) and halve (B)?

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Reaction A+B ->C
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2004, 12:34:46 PM »
A simple substitution into the rate equation would tell you the answer
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

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