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Topic: Oil properties  (Read 8342 times)

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-=J_D=-

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Oil properties
« on: January 18, 2006, 04:25:20 AM »
Ive been looking for a suitable liquid to immerse my pc in (motherboard etc.)

Ive been looking around for a while, and ive been suggested to use Mineral Oil, or Liquid Paraffin. I cant seem to find much information about them so ive got a couple of questions for both types of liquid.

What is the thermal conductivity of them at 30*?
What is their PH level?
Do either of them react with the parts found in a computer?
What is their viscosity at 30*?
Do either of them conduct electricity? (in case ive read wrong somewhere)

also, if there is a more suitable clear liquid available, any input would be appreciated. (bearing in mind, that i will need about 40 Ltrs, so it cant be too expensive)

crow_of_darkness

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Re:Oil properties
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2006, 08:03:55 AM »
    About paraffin: Its not a conductor of electricity. There are many types of parafine in market(thin or fat fluidity). So the conductivity, the ph and the viscosity, are affected from the fluidity of the original mixture. Melting point is 48 to 66 degrees of Celcium. Paraffin is a saturated hydrogoncarbon so it ''ll not react with the parts of the pc :)

Offline jdurg

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Re:Oil properties
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2006, 08:35:11 AM »
Oils are pretty good insulators, however, so if you submerge your system in something like a mineral oil it would be like wrapping insulation around all of your parts.  In addition, because oils don't conduct electricity at all, if any gets into the contacts between the pieces of your system and your motherboard it can affect how they transmit a signal thus hurting your computer's ability to work.
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-=J_D=-

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Re:Oil properties
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2006, 08:54:09 AM »
Oils are pretty good insulators, however, so if you submerge your system in something like a mineral oil it would be like wrapping insulation around all of your parts.  In addition, because oils don't conduct electricity at all, if any gets into the contacts between the pieces of your system and your motherboard it can affect how they transmit a signal thus hurting your computer's ability to work.

i was going to make my pc completely, no upgrading etc, and then glue / silicon all the connections of parts, say ram, cpu, pci etc, to prevent oil from getting in there.

as oils being an insulator, are you saying you dont think that the oil will draw the heat out of the components (such as the cpu), i am aware that oil isnt as good as water (de-ionised for a pc), i still dont trust water very much and other tests have proven water to crash the pc (although no damage was caused), an example of an oil pc project is here  http://www.tomshardware.com/2006/01/09/strip_out_the_fans/page2.html
they used vege oil, but i feel it was a temporary task (as vege oil would go rancid after a period of time) plus, its all brown, clear would be sooo much cooler.

Offline constant thinker

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Re:Oil properties
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2006, 05:36:49 PM »
If you have the money, expertise, and time liquid nitrogen would be sweet. You could overclock your computer like crazy. I already posted a reference to somebody using Liquid N2.


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Re:Oil properties
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2006, 09:09:42 PM »
Wouldn't you have to compress the nitrogen though? Wouldn't the motherboard explode/implode under the pressure?
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-=J_D=-

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Re:Oil properties
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2006, 05:56:09 AM »
not really interested in liquid nitro... its kool, but expensive, and sooo hard.

Lets assume that i want to fill a fish tank with a liquid and stick my pc in it, bearing in mind that costs, and maintenence will play a big part in my choice for liquid. And also, my original techinical questions that i asked, it would be great if someone knew the answer to them, i cant find them anywhere. thnx

Offline constant thinker

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Re:Oil properties
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2006, 08:53:16 PM »
Jdurg answered your question. Oils are insulators. They don't conduct electricity at all. As far as conductivity at 30°C (I'm assuming C), I think with jdurg's post we can already rule out oil. My post was simply an example of what some people are doing/have done. I realize it's an expensive solution to your problem, but maybe your someone who would want to do that kind of thing.

As far as P-man's question goes, you would need to purchase one of those high powered special compressors for this to be a long term solution. As far as the mother board imploding/exploding it would not. At hospitals, atleast ones in my area, they have massive compressors that are used to produce liquid O2. You get lots of N2 and other gasses in the air obviously. Here is the thing though when you compress air (in general) to a high enough point it will liquefy. This is obviously an exothermic process and the heat has to be drawn off and dissipated. The liquified gas though can then be drawn from the compressor and distilled into what you want. You can then place it in normal air pressure and it will remain a liquid till it absorbs enough heat to go back into a gas.

Further reading:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_Ice#Dry_Ice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles%27_law
(this link may just be helpful)
« Last Edit: January 19, 2006, 08:57:32 PM by mike »
"The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' " -Ronald Reagan

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-=J_D=-

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Re:Oil properties
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2006, 11:45:47 PM »
aight thnx

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