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Topic: searching high and low for the chemical named balanol with CAS number of 63590-1  (Read 9558 times)

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newcastler

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Hi I am searching high and low for the chemical named balanol with CAS number of 63590-19-2. However, I cannot find it in most chemical supplier websites. The last one quote me $3000 USD for 1 milligram. Please *delete me*!
« Last Edit: January 20, 2006, 01:16:55 AM by Mitch »

Offline Mitch

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2006, 12:26:43 AM »
What's the chemical structure? You can use the chmoogle box to search it, if you can draw it.
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Offline mike

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2006, 12:45:59 AM »
here is the structure if you want to try....
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Offline mike

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2006, 12:49:30 AM »
Quote
The last one quote me $3000 USD for 1 milligram

What about synthesising it for yourself?

Or you could look up the synthesis and contact the authors and see if they can supply you.
There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.

Offline Mitch

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2006, 12:57:03 AM »
Mike: How did you get that structure?

The SMILES code was O=C(O)c1cccc(O)c1C(=O)c4c(O)cc(C(=O)O[C@@H]2CCCNCC2NC(=O)c3ccc(O)cc3)cc4O for anyone interested in such nerdy affairs. :P

newcastler: Here is a link, maybe it'll help http://www.chmoogle.com/cgi-bin/search?t=ex&q=Oc1ccc%28cc1%29C%28%3DO%29NC1CNCCCC1OC%28%3DO%29c1cc%28O%29c%28c%28O%29c1%29C%28%3DO%29c1c%28O%29cccc1C%28%3DO%29O
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Offline mike

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2006, 01:00:07 AM »
Googled it, then drew it, then stuck in in this post :)

I also found some articles on it....
There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.

newcastler

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2006, 01:03:34 AM »
I cant seem to draw the structure. First time using such things. I got stuck at the part where there are 2 OH groups sticking out. Is there any good chemical supplier websites that can be recommended to search for this compound?

Offline mike

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2006, 01:07:06 AM »
What country are you in and how much do you need? Are you in a lab where you could synthesise it yourself?
There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.

newcastler

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2006, 01:12:46 AM »
I am in Singapore. And I am a research student. I am afraid that the synthesis of this compound may be beyond my capabilities for now as I do not have time and money. I am concurrently trying to find out the active compounds in some fungis. And balanol is one item we are interested in detecting.

Offline Mitch

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Re:Looking for chemical
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2006, 01:15:32 AM »
A well calibrated mass spectrometer could detect it without the need of a standard. What instrument are you trying to detect it with?

Also, most papers will say where they got their chemicals from. Have you seen where others in the literature got their balanol?
« Last Edit: January 20, 2006, 01:17:38 AM by Mitch »
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Offline Mitch

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Mike: And I thought you knew of some cool chemical structures database where you could look up any named compound you want. Apparently, you do and its called google. :P
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newcastler

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you mean GC-MS? I am trying to use this machine to detect certain compounds. However, I m dealing with complex extract as I am extracting them from fungi. So I am afraid the other compounds in the extract might hinder the detection.

I am looking very hard into the papers for the balanol now as well. Hopefully I get some answers soon.

I was thinking if I can get hold of the balanol standard, then I can use HPLC to detect and hopefully quantify the amount present. This seems easier to do compared to GC-MS where I will need a derivatization step. Am I correct?

Offline mike

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Mitch: yes I am a simple man with simple ideas. :)

Newcastler: What about my suggestion of contacting someone at another institute and seeing if they could suppliy a small amount for a standard?
There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.

newcastler

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I am currently searching through the journals and emailing the authors, cross my fingers and hope they will reply.

Anyway, can i continue in this tread and ask question regarding the analysis part of my project?

newcastler

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Hello again, I manage to contact a supplier and he mentioned that they have a racemic mixture of balanol. And from the CAS number I given them, they say what I needed was a disasteromer.

This is the first time that I came across the racemic term. Dictionary says that is is "relating to a chemical compound that contains equal quantities of dextrorotatory and levorotatory forms and therefore does not rotate the plane of incident polarized light."

In this case, can it still be detected by HPLC-UV? As I said, I need to use this as a standard to detect and quantify balanol in my sample.

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