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Topic: Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution  (Read 1444 times)

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Offline Archy12345

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Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution
« on: February 01, 2013, 04:45:57 AM »
Nevermind this post. I figured it out.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 05:02:43 AM by Archy12345 »

Offline sjb

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Re: Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2013, 05:27:38 AM »
Nevermind this post. I figured it out.

Why not post question and answer to help others that may pass this way in future?

Offline Archy12345

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Re: Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2013, 05:58:13 AM »
That's a good point.

My question had to do with the last step of the process. Let's say you were making Chlorobenzene from Benzene and chlorine using Iron (III) Chloride as a catalyst.
I was confused as to which molecule/atom accepted the proton from the benzene ring. My problem was that if FeCl3 accepted to proton then why would it not become CoCl3. I was sure this way of thinking was wrong, and it was. The FeCl3 donates its electron to a chlorine atom, and then the chlorine anion accepts the proton to make hydrogen chloride.

Offline Dan

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Re: Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2013, 06:06:16 AM »
The proton (H+) does not enter the Fe nucleus.

FeCl4- + H+  :rarrow: FeCl3 + HCl
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