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Topic: Electrodes and calculations for electrolysis of different materials  (Read 1746 times)

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Offline herla

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Hi, I'm new here at the forum, a University student (not chemistry), but a hobby chemist with some experience. My current project is electrolysis. Please forgive my noob-like questions.

Sulphuric acid CuSO4 + H2O:rarrow:Cu (s) + H2SO4 Question: which materials should I use for the anode and cathode respectively?

Sincerely yours.

Offline Arkcon

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Re: Electrodes and calculations for electrolysis of different materials
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 05:58:58 PM »
That is not an electrolysis.  True you are reducing Cu2+ to Cu0, but you have not written an oxidation.  True to figure one out, to see what's happening at the other electrode.  Anyway, a graphite electrode made from mechanical pencil lead is a good cheap homemade electrode.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline herla

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Re: Electrodes and calculations for electrolysis of different materials
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2013, 08:12:50 PM »
I apologize for getting the nomenclature mixed up.

You have a good point, however I'm not really interested in this reaction, I'm interested in making small quantities of high purity H2SO4 for my organic chemistry experiments. Many organic solvents such as Diethyl ether require small amounts of sulphuric acid. The alternative would be to contact my friends at the steel mill and ask them for a 25L 6½ gallon jug of industrial grade (fairly contaminated) H2SO4. Do you see my goal now?

A carbon/graphite electrode will disintegrate filling the water with coal particles, easy to filter out but still something I'd like to avoid. Question: is there any alternative, other than carbon, to an expensive platinum electrode?

If not, where do I buy platinum electrodes?

All help is greatly appreciated!

Sincerely yours.

Offline billnotgatez

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Re: Electrodes and calculations for electrolysis of different materials
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2013, 08:26:53 PM »
http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=65931.msg237290#msg237290
The above was my response to someone asking for sources of another chemical

I actually got my sulfuric acid (battery acid) at the automotive store.

But, I am not discouraging you trying to make small amounts for yourself.
Just be careful!

By the way certain flashlight batteries have a carbon electrode inside of them.
Again, be careful when taking them apart.

I GOOGLE Platinum and went to a site that sells electrodes.
A little to pricey for my tastes.



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