July 07, 2020, 12:38:42 PM
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Topic: Chemistry of phenols  (Read 5275 times)

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Offline Rutherford

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Re: Chemistry of phenols
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2013, 01:46:31 PM »
How would that reaction happen?
I wrote that I got that L is salicylic acid.

Offline discodermolide

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Re: Chemistry of phenols
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2013, 01:48:39 PM »
How would that reaction happen?
I wrote that I got that L is salicylic acid.


Sorry I meant N
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Offline Rutherford

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Re: Chemistry of phenols
« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2013, 01:52:40 PM »
I don't understand the previous reaction and I don't have a clue about the following one, but when going backwards I could say that N is similar to Aluminon, only all NH4- groups are replaced with hydrogens.

Offline discodermolide

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Re: Chemistry of phenols
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2013, 02:00:06 PM »
All that replacement is is forming the ammonium salts.
Have a look here.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurintricarboxylic_acid

The reaction of 2 x L with formaldehyde and sulphuric acid to give N is surely a Friedel-Crafts acylation?
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Offline Rutherford

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Re: Chemistry of phenols
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2013, 02:41:19 PM »
What reaction produces the electrophile?

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