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Topic: Same name different formula  (Read 1685 times)

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Offline Slapgravel

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Same name different formula
« on: May 24, 2013, 07:47:26 AM »
Hi guys,

So I've been working with Hexabenzocoronene...2 different forms, the [a,d,g,j,m,p] and the contorted [bc,ef,hi,kl,no,qr] (attached). Now in my absent mindedness I have been referring to these as 'isomers' which I realised that they are clearly not when you get C/H - counting. When conducting my work I refer to them lots....'like the whole group hates me lots' but now I don't know what they are => wrt each other, them both having the same name.

Is there a term that describes this relationship between the 2 HBC molecules? 1,3b1,7,9b1,13,18-hexahydrohexabenzo[bc,ef,hi,kl,no,qr]coronene and trinaphtho[1,2,3,4-fgh:1',2',3',4'-pqr:1'',2'',3'',4''-za<sub>1</sub>b<sub>1</sub>]trinaphthylene just doesn't have the same ring to it.

I'll be sad if there isn't.

Thanks in advance

Offline discodermolide

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Re: Same name different formula
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2013, 07:53:47 AM »
The top structure is
1,3b1,7,9b1,13,18-hexahydrohexabenzo[bc,ef,hi,kl,no,qr]coronene

The bottom is

trinaphtho[1,2,3,4-fgh:1',2',3',4'-pqr:1'',2'',3'',4''-za<sub>1</sub>b<sub>1</sub>]trinaphthylene

according to ChemDraw. Don't ask why the <sub>1… etc means, I've no idea.
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Offline Slapgravel

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Re: Same name different formula
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2013, 07:58:38 AM »
Aye, I posted them above :) Its not the names I'm interested in...it's the relationship between the names and structure.

Offline Dan

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Re: Same name different formula
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2013, 08:26:12 AM »
My research: Google Scholar and Researchgate

Offline orgopete

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Re: Same name different formula
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2013, 08:56:57 AM »
I had to look some stuff up to answer this question (you should interpret this to indicate that scientific names may be unique to structures more than comprehensible, show a group of chemists the names and ask them to draw the structures). Okay, how are the structures related to each other, they could be described as coronene analogs. For example dodecamethyl, ethyl, chloro, etc., would be coronene analogs. Your compounds are also coronene analogs in which six benzene rings have been joined to coronene. In the top structure, the benzo rings are joined to three atoms around the ring. You may find the prefix peribenzo associated with this structure. In the lower structure, again six benzene rings have been joined now with two carbons and thus could be called a hexabenzocoronene (for example, see benzodiazepine). If you had dodecachloro and dodecabromocoronenes, you would call them analogs as they are not isomers. This is the same principle.
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