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Topic: Is chemistry as a field dead or just dead in U.S.A?  (Read 4426 times)

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Helter

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Is chemistry as a field dead or just dead in U.S.A?
« on: October 29, 2014, 07:37:05 AM »
Hi, I am planning on studying a Bsc degree in chemistry next year but I've been reading that the field is apparently dying. Most of the issues seems to occur in U.S.A. I live in South Africa but I am worried if the profession is dead worldwide. Can any chemists out there perhaps give me some insight?

Offline Hunter2

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Re: Is chemistry as a field dead or just dead in U.S.A?
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2014, 08:06:00 AM »
I don't think so, every profession is needed in the future. In chemistry is its a wide field to work in future. Also in your country and the continent it needs people to develop it further.

Offline Corribus

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Re: Is chemistry as a field dead or just dead in U.S.A?
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2014, 09:43:39 AM »
I've been reading that the field is apparently dying.
I'd like to know where you've read that.
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

Helter

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Re: Is chemistry as a field dead or just dead in U.S.A?
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2014, 10:39:30 AM »
I've been reading that the field is apparently dying.
I'd like to know where you've read that.

I've been getting most of my information on forums and different websites. Almost everywhere I read on the forums,  the majority complain that the field is dying and that they cannot find good jobs.

http://chemistry.about.com/u/ua/educationemployment/chemists.07.htm

For example, the above link, majority say they cannot find jobs. I like chemistry and I really want to study the field but I also want to be able to support my financial needs one day. I don't care about riches or anything, just enough to sustain myself.

Helter

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Re: Is chemistry as a field dead or just dead in U.S.A?
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2014, 10:40:30 AM »
I don't think so, every profession is needed in the future. In chemistry is its a wide field to work in future. Also in your country and the continent it needs people to develop it further.

I have read a degree in chemistry opens up opportunities for other fields as well so that is good I guess.

Offline Corribus

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Re: Is chemistry as a field dead or just dead in U.S.A?
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2014, 10:55:32 AM »
It is fallacious to conclude that "chemistry is dead" because a few people lament not being able to find a job. First, you must be careful when making a hasty generalization based on a potentially small but vocal minority. The people who cannot find a job - is it because of their personal circumstances, or because of chemistry in general? Even if it can be shown that it is hard to find a job in the chemical sciences (generally), the job market is complex and the ability of chemistry graduates to find jobs could have more to do with the economy than the state of chemistry. It could also have a lot to do with personal preferences and what types of jobs chemistry graduates are willing to accept.

Frankly, I think this paranoia about "chemistry is dead" is rather silly. As long as there is commercial demand for drugs, foods, materials, energy sources, and so on, there will be a need for chemistry. The unpredictable highs and lows of the job market will never fundamentally change that.
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

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