September 24, 2021, 07:46:05 AM
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Topic: Former Ph.D. student needs introductory chemistry or biochemistry textbook  (Read 2356 times)

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Offline mileena

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Hi, I am in my 40's and on Social Security and SSI. I already have my B.A. summa cum laude with Highest Distinction in linguistics from a top 25 school, and also was a former Ph.D. student in the same field at an Ivy League institution. I have only a high school science and math background, but I always did well in those areas. Unfortunately, graduate linguistics didn't work out for personal reasons (nothing to do with academics). Perhaps that is good, as here are no jobs in linguistics anyway (I have watched many of my former classmates struggle finding jobs in this field, even with a Ph.D.); and I learned I really don't have an interest in that field. I want to get off Social Security, finish my education, and get a job. I have decided to switch and get my Ph.D. in a more marketable area, a STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) field. I want to do cancer and/or obesity research since they have affected my family tremendously, and I have found I have a real passion for those areas. So, would biochemistry be right for me? Or biology? Or chemistry? A Ph.D. is one of these areas is a must for me. I thrive in academe.

Since I already have a B.A. from the early 90's and consider myself to be pretty intelligent and diligent (not trying to brag here), and since I don't have much money, I just plan to wing it, and give myself the equivalent of a "home-schooled" undergraduate education in one of the above science fields in just a few years. I will take some community college courses (free for low income people in California) for academic references, and beg my way into labs or internships if I need do. The sooner I get this done, the sooner I can apply for graduate school.

So, I need to get some introductory books to study on my own. The ones in the sticky thread on top of this forum seem dated. Does anybody have any suggestions, or other advice for me?

Thanks!

Offline Arkcon

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There are perfectly good choices in the sticky.  And for many of them, there are useful reasons why a particular text is better for one sort of problem or another.  So try to read them all the posts (yeah, its a lot) and make some selections to start.   You can try talking to the course instructors, and see what they suggest as type of problems you'll experience, and see what they suggest.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline mileena

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Thanks so much Arkcon. I will read the thread to get some ideas!

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