July 02, 2020, 01:53:51 AM
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Topic: Disolving Tungsten hexachloride in 50% ethanol + distilled water question  (Read 5278 times)

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Offline AlbericOmer

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Hello everybody, first I would like to apologize if this is not the place for my topic! I really hit the rock bottom with this issue. For couple of weeks I am trying to produce a stable solution of WCl6 dissolved in Ethanol + water solution. I tried different sequences for putting the solutes, but I can't reach a stable solution. I tried also heating at 50 - 60 degrees Celsius, but with the same result. Do anybody know, or have any bodie tried, this kind of mixture before, and could anybody please give me some hints on the dissolution process. The main problem, is the fact, I am not a chemist, I am physicist, and afterwords when I have this solution, I would like to prepare a thin solid film of WO3 (using spray pyrolysis). Usually I am using different methods of preparation, but for my thesis I will have to use also this preparation technique...

Thank you all in advance, will really appreciate some *delete me* :)

Offline curiouscat

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Quote
I can't reach a stable solution.

What exactly happens?

Isn't it subject to hydrolysis?

Offline AlbericOmer

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It's not dissolving... the solution for the SP must be particle free, so that the fuse won't be blocked, but the WCl6 is not completely dissolved. In the compound characteristics it says that it is subjected to hydrolysis, but that's not what happens when you put it in the water. :)

Offline curiouscat

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Can you use carbon disulfide or carbon tetrachloride instead?

Offline AlbericOmer

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Yes, in general it is possible. The basic idea, was the use of nontoxic solvents. But, I guess, in the end (since the time is pressing me) I will try them as well. :) Though, thanks very much for the advices!

Offline curiouscat

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How long did you heat to dissolve? Was there good stirring?

Offline Dan

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I'm pretty sure WCl6 will react with protic solvents - i.e. it will not exist as WCl6 in EtOH/water.

I'd try aprotic solvents - you may find a non-toxic option. A quick google suggests it is soluble in chlorocarbons, so maybe chloroform is a better option than CCl4 in terms of toxicity? You could check a few non-chlorinated solvents as well just to check.
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Offline AlbericOmer

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Thanks a lot for all of the advices, I am going in the lab to try it now! :)

I wanted a 0.01M solution (50 ml), made the necessary calculations and put the WCl6 in a cuvette, then the ethanol 25 ml. (the only way there was a noticeable decomposition) stir it a bit on a heater (first time no heating, then I heated it up to 50-60 degs.). So far, no complete dissolution. Then I started to put gradually small amounts of distilled water, up to 25 ml. In the end, (this was the best result so far) it was almost dissolved completely, but upon more precise check, there were still particles visible.

Anyway, I will try with the chlorocarbons.

Offline AlbericOmer

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Hey guys, IT WORKED! :D Thanks a lot for all of the *delete me* Finally it dissolved in chloroform, currently is being stirred.

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