October 24, 2021, 01:20:14 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: what makes dimethyl ketone such a good solvent?  (Read 7404 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline iScience

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 150
  • Mole Snacks: +4/-22
Re: what makes dimethyl ketone such a good solvent?
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2013, 08:01:45 AM »
a feedback would be nice for confirmation or rejection..

Offline Babcock_Hall

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4930
  • Mole Snacks: +288/-22
Re: what makes dimethyl ketone such a good solvent?
« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2013, 09:42:51 AM »
I would describe acetone as only moderately polar (there is no hydrogen bond donor but there is one acceptor), but glass is quite polar (there are hydrogen bond donors and acceptors).  Therefore, a nonpolar substance is more like acetone than silica.

Offline Arkcon

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7367
  • Mole Snacks: +533/-147
Re: what makes dimethyl ketone such a good solvent?
« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2013, 10:42:01 AM »
a feedback would be nice for confirmation or rejection..

I don't believe acetone is a good reagent for removing non-polar compounds.  As I described originally, its used to remove water from a flask, or other vessel with a narrow neck, before drying.  I've never used it to remove a sticky, non-polar substance from glass.  I don't believe that a small molecule like acetone is non-polar enough to really interact with long hydrocarbon "oily" tails.  So no, your conclusion on the other page:

 
oh hey! i think i got it. so you're saying, although just a monomer of the glass doesn't do very much, since it's in an array, the whole provide the large surface area required for the van der waal's interaction between it and the large non-polar tail?

which, if i apply this to the dimethl ketone case, since the dimethyl ketone is polar, the acetone species interact with each other cohesively and the oily tails interact via... well at this point wouldn't it be an induced dipole interaction? since there is a predominant electric field direction eminating from parts of the acetone (since it is polar), thereby inducing a dipole in the constituents of the oily tail resulting in a net attractive force; and basically this way, the dimethyl ketone is actually dragging the oily tails along with the rest of the acetone fluid? is this correct?

While technically correct in how you reasoned it out, doesn't describe what acetone does, so is simply wrong.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2013, 11:08:25 AM by Arkcon »
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline iScience

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 150
  • Mole Snacks: +4/-22
Re: what makes dimethyl ketone such a good solvent?
« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2013, 11:54:10 PM »
Okay thanks guys!! :)

Sponsored Links