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Topic: PV=nRT  (Read 23262 times)

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vmaniscalco

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PV=nRT
« on: March 01, 2006, 12:41:01 PM »
Hey everyone Im new to this forums but I am having some problems with my chemistry and I was wondering if someone could help me to figure this out. So I just cannot figure what to use for R what do i put in for R when i am trying to solve for moles and I have ATM's for my pressure..? thanks

Offline Albert

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Re:PV=nRT
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2006, 12:54:26 PM »
R = 8.20575 10-2  L atm K-1 mol-1

vmaniscalco

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Re:PV=nRT
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2006, 06:50:35 PM »
So then What do I use for L?

Offline AWK

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Re:PV=nRT
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2006, 01:21:06 AM »
L means volume of 1 liter (or 1 dm3 - hence in your calculation you should use volume in liters
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Offline xiankai

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Re:PV=nRT
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2006, 07:47:11 AM »
there are many variations of R, all depending on what units are being considered. so depending on the context, u may want to us other values for convenience.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_constant
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:PV=nRT
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2006, 06:51:20 PM »
Perfect Gas Equation: PV = nRT

P: pressure, SI Unit: Pa
V: volume, SI Unit: m3
n: amount of substance, SI Unit: moles
R: molar gas constant, 8.314 J/K.mol
T: thermodynamic temperature, SI Unit Kelvin

This equation is otherwise known as the Ideal Gas law. It relates the pressure and volume to the temperature and the mass of the gas. A gas that behaves according to this equation is called a perfect/ideal gas.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2006, 06:55:02 PM by geodome »
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