October 16, 2021, 04:52:01 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Some questions about redox reactions  (Read 1384 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Stellahung1215

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-2
Some questions about redox reactions
« on: December 29, 2013, 02:33:36 AM »
My textbook says that when sodium iodide solution and iron(Ⅲ) nitrate solution are mixed directly, iron(Ⅲ) ions will gain electrons.
According to the ECS, nitrate ion is a stronger oxidizing agent than iron(Ⅲ)ion.
So why do iron(Ⅲ)ions gain electrons instead of nitrate ions?
thanks

Offline Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Posts: 26791
  • Mole Snacks: +1737/-403
  • Gender: Male
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: Some questions about redox reactions
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2013, 03:43:34 AM »
How strong oxidizer pH is depends on pH. If pH is not low enough, Fe3+ can be a stronger oxidizer (although it won't exist in teh solution if pH is not low enough). This is described by Nernst equation.

Plus, sometimes redox potential of some system present in the solution is high enough, but the kinetics favors other system.
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Offline Stellahung1215

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-2
Re: Some questions about redox reactions
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2013, 09:16:41 PM »
How strong oxidizer pH is depends on pH. If pH is not low enough, Fe3+ can be a stronger oxidizer (although it won't exist in teh solution if pH is not low enough). This is described by Nernst equation.

Plus, sometimes redox potential of some system present in the solution is high enough, but the kinetics favors other system.

Okay, thanks. I have thought about this before but I wasn't sure.

Sponsored Links