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Topic: Li+H2SO4  (Read 9406 times)

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Offline Shadow

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Li+H2SO4
« on: January 30, 2014, 08:16:04 AM »
What is the chemical equation of the reaction of Lithium and diluted sulfuric acid? What's the reaction with concentrated sulfuric acid? I think that in one situation sulfur dioxide will be produced and in another hydrogen, but I am not sure which in which one. Need help for deducing this.

Offline Borek

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2014, 10:06:41 AM »
Let's start with something simpler - how do the alkali metals react with water?
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Offline Shadow

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2014, 10:28:18 AM »
I know that, hydrogen reduces to gas, and alkali is produced.

Offline DrCMS

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2014, 11:22:27 AM »
OK how does an acid and alkali react?

Offline Shadow

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2014, 12:32:00 PM »
Wasn't that my original question? I read somewhere that in diluted solutions hydrogen gas will be produced, and in concentrated sulfur dioxide, but why is it so? I need the reasoning behind this, not to write simple equations.

Offline Borek

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2014, 01:16:35 PM »
Wasn't that my original question?

No. Lithium is not a base, it is a metal.
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Offline Shadow

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2014, 01:28:19 PM »
I thought that he mean alkali metal. Why is this relevant? It would be just neutralization (base+acid). Again, what happens when lithium react with dil. or conc. sulfuric acid?

Offline Borek

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2014, 01:48:08 PM »
OK, let's try from different direction. How do the metals react with acids in general?
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Offline Shadow

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2014, 02:09:30 PM »
I can't generalize that. If a transition metal react with e.g. nitric acid of different concentrations, a complex mixture of gasses is produced. In the case I am interested in, there are two possibilities. Only what I can say is that the metal gets oxidized and that hydrogen or another element composing the acid can get reduced.

Offline discodermolide

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2014, 02:30:17 PM »
If I may chip in here. Is water behaving like an acid in its reaction with an alkali metal such as lithium?
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Offline Shadow

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2014, 03:00:13 PM »
No, isn't it redox reaction?

Offline Borek

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2014, 05:00:06 PM »
Sure it is a redox reaction. We are back to the starting point - how do metals react with acids in general?

To point you in the right direction: metal gets oxidized. What is the oxidizer?
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Offline Shadow

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2014, 09:21:35 AM »
Again, either hydrogen or another element with a high oxidation state that composes the acid. Which will be the oxidizer in conc. and which one in dil. solutions?

Offline Borek

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2014, 12:41:31 PM »
Again, either hydrogen or another element with a high oxidation state that composes the acid.

And what does it depend on? Have you heard about reactivity series?
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Offline Shadow

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Re: Li+H2SO4
« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2014, 01:38:06 PM »
DIdn't, but I read in wikkipedia about it, Li is very reactive, but there wasn't a word about change of acid concentration.

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