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Topic: Re: Why is calcium chloride basic/alkaline, with a pH of 8-9?  (Read 1587 times)

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YouRang

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I hope someone has a notification on this topic--I don't want to start it again.
Can it be as BluRay suggested that eating the CO2 makes it mildly alkaline.  It may be that in solution with many (all?) food acids, it gobbles up the acid moiety.  E.g. ricotta cheese is 100% whey.  And ricotta is wonderful; but whey as part of curds and whey is disgustingly sour.  So I'm thinking C1Cl^2+ eats up the acid (probably predominantly lactate moiety)?

Offline Arkcon

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Re: Re: Why is calcium chloride basic/alkaline, with a pH of 8-9?
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2014, 03:40:33 PM »
I'm sorry, but I'm having a hard time understanding your question.  I'll try to take it point by point, and we'll try to see where I'm having trouble, and where your question is.

Lets start with the basic chemical concepts this thread was able to explain -- CaCl2 is a neutral salt, and although its pH in solution depends on its pKa, pKa is not a synonym for pH.

I hope someone has a notification on this topic--I don't want to start it again.
Can it be as BluRay suggested that eating the CO2 makes it mildly alkaline.

I'm left wondering two or three things -- where is CO2 mentioned in this discussion?  Furthermore, we rarely use the term "eating" chemically.  SO why would you say that?

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It may be that in solution with many (all?) food acids, it gobbles up the acid moiety.

What does?  And how do you mean this concept.

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E.g. ricotta cheese is 100% whey.  And ricotta is wonderful; but whey as part of curds and whey is disgustingly sour.  So I'm thinking C1Cl^2+ eats up the acid (probably predominantly lactate moiety)?

None of this has a bearing on this discussion, nor is it correct chemically, and is self contradictory and subjective, even taken on its own.

Listen, I have to assume you're following something akin to the topic of an "alkaline diet" as in this Wikipedia article here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkaline_diet  Or some variation on the topic, at any rate.  Since that topic really doesn't use chemistry concepts correctly, its going to be impossible for us to work through this from a student's standpoint.   Maybe you can try to clarify, possibly with a new post of your own.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

YouRang

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Re: Re: Why is calcium chloride basic/alkaline, with a pH of 8-9?
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2014, 04:27:19 PM »
I'm using gobbling and eating in the sense of the other posts in which the pK frees up some moieties when the salt is in solution with something in addition to H2O--most likely lactate in this particular case.

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