May 28, 2022, 10:49:06 PM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: how to prove the PE of hexagonal closed packing structure to be 0.74?  (Read 5890 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

cistran

  • Guest
Every general chemistry textbook discusses the method of calculating the packing efficiency (PE) of simple cubic, bcc and fcc structure. But I haven't found any book mentioning about how to prove the PE of hexagonal closed packing structure to be 0.74. Do you have any suggestion how to find it?
« Last Edit: March 30, 2006, 09:25:10 PM by Mitch »

Offline AWK

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7982
  • Mole Snacks: +555/-93
  • Gender: Male
AWK

cistran

  • Guest
Re:how to prove the PE of hexagonal closed packing structure to be 0.74?
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2006, 02:29:57 AM »
It's a very informative site and I really enjoy reading its. But so far, it seems to me that I could not use these to help my students understand this problem. Do you know any simpler and more understandable method?

Offline AWK

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7982
  • Mole Snacks: +555/-93
  • Gender: Male
Re:how to prove the PE of hexagonal closed packing structure to be 0.74?
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2006, 03:33:47 AM »
A proof of Kepler conjecture was done by Tom Hales about 10 years ago.

http://www.math.princeton.edu/~annals/issues/2005/Nov2005/Hales.pdf

Understaning of this proof  even transcends abilities of most matematicians.
(The refereeing process involved more than 12 referees over a five year period).
But stiil you can calculate density of packing for HCP, CCP or BCC by comparing volume of balls to volume of hexagonal prism or cube and treat this results as formal proof.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2006, 03:04:59 AM by AWK »
AWK

Offline Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Posts: 27090
  • Mole Snacks: +1759/-405
  • Gender: Male
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re:how to prove the PE of hexagonal closed packing structure to be 0.74?
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2006, 04:00:47 AM »
It's a very informative site and I really enjoy reading its. But so far, it seems to me that I could not use these to help my students understand this problem. Do you know any simpler and more understandable method?

Do I understand you correctly - are you looking for a way to just calculate the 0.74 value?

Take a look at the lattice - it is made of repeated identical regular tetrahedrons. You can easily calculate its volume, you should also have no problems with calculating what part of this tehrahedron volume is taken by the spheres located in vertices. That should be a starting point.

Take a look at the picture - it is only 2-D case, but hopefully you should get what I mean. Blue surface is tehrahedron minus red. Now do it in 3d.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2006, 04:01:22 AM by Borek »
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Sponsored Links