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Topic: A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog  (Read 3179 times)

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Offline Mitch

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A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog
« on: September 29, 2014, 02:30:06 AM »
Thoughts?
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Offline Borek

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Re: A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2014, 03:12:01 AM »
Better to be a human?

You can not only see better, but also discuss the differences?
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Offline discodermolide

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Re: A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2014, 03:57:39 AM »
So a dog can't drive a car because he can't see the traffic light colours.
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Offline Ben Bob2

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Re: A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2014, 05:59:34 AM »
Dogs would also have great difficulty translating electrostatic potential maps.
Just kidding; that's pretty cool.
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Offline kriggy

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Re: A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2014, 08:59:54 AM »
Yo listen up heres a story about a little guy that lives in a blue world.
And all day and all night and everything he sees is jsut blue like him inside and outside.


Its very interesting, how did they figure it out?

Offline curiouscat

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Re: A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2014, 09:03:24 AM »
Its very interesting, how did they figure it out?

Exactly what I want to know!

Offline Borek

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Re: A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2014, 09:57:22 AM »
Actually I doubt we know how the dog "sees" the world, but finding out if it is capable of recognizing colors should be a matter of rather simple tests (say, try to teach it tricks that require recognizing color of an object, if it can't recognize the color, it won't be able to learn). Plus, there should be possible leads in the microanatomy of the eye and biochemistry of the photopsins present in the eye.
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Offline curiouscat

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Re: A picture comparison of the normal human spectrum and dog
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2014, 10:04:52 AM »
Actually I doubt we know how the dog "sees" the world, but finding out if it is capable of recognizing colors should be a matter of rather simple tests

Good idea. Yes, by exhaustive tests with pairs of colors knowing which ones it cannot distinguish ought to tell us something.

Maybe the large swathe of brown represents these cannot-distinguish combinations.

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