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Topic: Advanced Electrochemistry Homework Help  (Read 2178 times)

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Offline tourdejohn

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Advanced Electrochemistry Homework Help
« on: October 01, 2014, 05:39:57 PM »
I'm enrolled in a very difficult advanced electrochemistry class. We have homework due tomorrow. I'm very stressed and need help. I will be willing to pay for help through paypal. Msg me if interested

Offline Mitch

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Re: Advanced Electrochemistry Homework Help
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2014, 06:50:35 PM »
You can ask specific questions on the forum
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1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
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Offline tourdejohn

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Re: Advanced Electrochemistry Homework Help
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2014, 10:38:30 PM »
You can ask specific questions on the forum

ok, thanks! I just don't understand this question. I think it involves the nernst equation

Consider the electrode/water based solution interface Pt/Ag+ (0.0001 M), Cu2+ (0.01M),
Pb2+ (0.1 M), HClO4 (1 M) and write the equation (s) for the electrode reaction (s) that
occur (s) at applied potentials of:
a) 1.4 V
b) 0.6 V
c) 0.2 V
d) – 0.6 V

Offline mjc123

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Re: Advanced Electrochemistry Homework Help
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2014, 08:31:28 AM »
Consider the various redox reactions that could occur, e.g. the reduction of Ag+ to metallic Ag. Look up the standard electrode potential for this couple, and apply the Nernst equation to find the electrode potential at the given concentration of 0.0001 M Ag+. At applied potentials lower than this, Ag+ will be reduced to Ag.
Repeat with the other species.

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