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Topic: Wurtz Reaction  (Read 1453 times)

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Offline peterek0

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Wurtz Reaction
« on: October 04, 2014, 09:11:42 AM »
Hi,
I have a question regarding Wurtz reaction. Why do we connect two halogenoalkens with the same number of carbons. Why can't i join toughter diffrerent ones?

Offline Dan

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Re: Wurtz Reaction
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2014, 09:35:00 AM »
Well you can, but there is a problem.

If I gave you a bag containing 100 black marbles and 100 white marbles and asked you to draw out 100 pairs blindfolded, what combinations would you expect to draw?
My research: Google Scholar and Researchgate

Offline peterek0

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Re: Wurtz Reaction
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2014, 09:55:15 AM »
50/50

So we use the same halogenoalkans to avoid gaining multiple different alkans. I see.
Thanks a lot :)

Offline Dan

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Re: Wurtz Reaction
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2014, 10:31:13 AM »
50/50
Quote

No, there are 3 combinations - black/black, black/white and white/white.

Quote
So we use the same halogenoalkans to avoid gaining multiple different alkans. I see.
Thanks a lot :)

Yes. See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wurtz_reaction#Limitations
My research: Google Scholar and Researchgate

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