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Topic: Specific heat Capacity of HCl  (Read 103282 times)

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Offline Mikez

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Specific heat Capacity of HCl
« on: April 08, 2006, 05:35:39 PM »
Does anyone know the C of MgO? I need it to find the delta H of it and the Q of it.

thanks :)
« Last Edit: April 11, 2006, 07:44:14 PM by Mikez »

Offline xiankai

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Re: Specific heat Capacity of MgO
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2006, 08:22:20 PM »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnesium_oxide

according to wiki its 877 J kg-1 K-1
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Offline Mikez

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Re: Specific heat Capacity of HCl
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2006, 08:00:34 PM »
one last thing, what is the heat capacity of HCl (hydrochloric acid) it wasn't on wiki

Offline mike

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Re: Specific heat Capacity of HCl
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2006, 08:13:19 PM »
The specific heat capacity of dilute HCl is basically the same as water:

4.18 J.g-1.K-1
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Offline xiankai

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Re: Specific heat Capacity of HCl
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2006, 06:02:56 AM »
doesnt the HCl absorb heat? this is something new to me :o
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Offline plu

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Re: Specific heat Capacity of HCl
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2006, 08:18:21 PM »
doesnt the HCl absorb heat? this is something new to me :o

Yes, of course.  But in most situations where the solute (HCl) is dilute, the specific heat capacity of the solvent (water) will only be affected to a minimal degree.  Thus, the specific heat capacity of a dilute solution of HCl is very close to the specific heat capacity of pure water (4.184 J K-1 g-1).

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: Specific heat Capacity of HCl
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2006, 09:25:58 PM »
you might need to consider if HCl evaporates from the solution as HCl gas upon absorption of heat.
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Offline ARGOS++

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Re: Specific heat Capacity of HCl
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2008, 06:10:47 PM »

Dear All;

After I just realised how frequently this Topic is visited/searched, I think this Question deservers a somehow little more adequate answer, because, in contrary to the posts above, the property: “Specific Heat Capacity” depends very strong of the amount of Solute in Water.

In case of HCl solution you may visit:    "Specific Heat Capacity Question
And for the same values in kJoules kg-1 °K-1 see on:   "Question about Specific Heat Capacity …

Good Luck!
                    ARGOS++


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