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Topic: Movement of Electrons  (Read 3916 times)

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Offline T

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Movement of Electrons
« on: July 18, 2015, 03:49:58 AM »
Hello,

The question is what is the movement of electrons in the attached pictures.

For the first reaction:

What I think will happen is the H+ has separated from the NH3 and the OH- has bonded with the H to form H2O. Something needs to replace the OH's spot in the molecule so the NH3 will turn into NH2 and H+. The NH2 will take the OH spot while the H+ will join with the H2O to form H3O+. Is this right?

For the second reaction:

From my understanding, ethene can be hydrogenated to form ethane. However there is only 1 hydrogen available. If the double bond breaks and 1 of the carbon bonds with the hydrogen then the other carbon will not have enough electrons. Could someone give me a hint?

Thanks

Offline Dan

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Re: Movement of Electrons
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2015, 04:43:29 AM »
For the first reaction:

What I think will happen is the H+ has separated from the NH3 and the OH- has bonded with the H to form H2O. Something needs to replace the OH's spot in the molecule so the NH3 will turn into NH2 and H+. The NH2 will take the OH spot while the H+ will join with the H2O to form H3O+. Is this right?

There is no H2O in this question, and there is certainly no NH2 produced. It is difficult to follow what you have written - it is better to draw (or use precise scientific terminology).

Quote
For the second reaction:

If the double bond breaks and 1 of the carbon bonds with the hydrogen then the other carbon will not have enough electrons. Could someone give me a hint?

You are correct that protonation of an alkene will leave behind an electron deficient C. Have you learnt about carbocations?
My research: Google Scholar and Researchgate

Offline T

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Re: Movement of Electrons
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2015, 06:25:09 PM »
There is no H2O in this question, and there is certainly no NH2 produced.

Since there is no NH2 produced, would it be safe to assume that after the H+ leaves the NH3 the NH3 does nothing more in the reaction?

Have you learnt about carbocations?

So I read about carbocations on this site: http://www.chemguide.co.uk/mechanisms/eladd/carbonium.html

From what I read, it is possible that the reaction could turn into CH2 - CH3. Since alkyl groups "push" away electrons then the + CH2 would turn a bit negative because of the pushing. So I gather that the answer would be
CH2 - CH3?

Thanks

Offline Dan

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Re: Movement of Electrons
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2015, 06:54:38 PM »
So I gather that the answer would be
CH2 - CH3?

Check your charge balance.
My research: Google Scholar and Researchgate

Offline T

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Re: Movement of Electrons
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2015, 06:56:41 PM »
CH2+ - CH3?

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