June 24, 2019, 11:55:06 PM
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Topic: (Biochem) What reactions does estrogen cause in the uterus during menstruation?  (Read 1547 times)

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Offline treadlightly

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This question borders on biochemistry and endocrinology. I am curious what the effects of estrogen are in the uterus during menstruation. I know the overall outcome is that it thickens uterine lining, but I want to know what reactions are taking place during this whole process. What things are inhibited, activated, etc.?

I've looked online and so far what I know is that in rats, estrogen causes both the release of neuroprogesterone to activate GnRH neurons to release LH onto gonadotropes. What I do not know is how does this effect the uterus? Is there any evidence of it happening in humans?

Offline Arkcon

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This question borders on biochemistry and endocrinology. I am curious what the effects of estrogen are in the uterus during menstruation. I know the overall outcome is that it thickens uterine lining, but I want to know what reactions are taking place during this whole process. What things are inhibited, activated, etc.?

I've looked online and so far what I know is that in rats, estrogen causes both the release of neuroprogesterone to activate GnRH neurons to release LH onto gonadotropes. What I do not know is how does this effect the uterus? Is there any evidence of it happening in humans?

Its hard to know what you're actually asking, when you ask "reactions taking place."  Briefly, in the buildup to menstruation, cell are proliferating.  More, individual, cells and capillaries are growing, reproducing, and organizing into extra living tissue.  You want a list of those reactions?  That's not possible in a forum posting.  Maybe you'd like to understand the endocrinology genetically?  That's a bit easier, steroid hormones do pass right through the cell membrane, and interact with nuclear proteins to activate genes.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

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