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Topic: How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?  (Read 10949 times)

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Offline Winga

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How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« on: July 31, 2004, 12:37:58 PM »
e.g. When sodium chloride (NaCl) is added to water, two forms of ions are formed, Na+ & Cl-. I want only one form of ions (e.g. Na+) present in water, what can I do?

Offline jdurg

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2004, 05:24:16 PM »
You will NEVER have a solution with only positive, or only negative, ions in solution.  Doing so would break so many chemical/physical laws.   :P
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Offline Winga

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2004, 11:41:30 PM »
precipitate the Cl- with Ag+. It's not really meaningful to have only Na+ in solution?
This process is not worked, because another anion from the compound of Ag+ ion with that anion is released.

Offline Winga

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2004, 11:46:05 PM »
If I am now not isolated one form of ions, I just make a solution with one ion, is there any method?

Can I ionize the Na atom in its gas phase and then pump into the water?

ssssss

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2004, 04:17:45 AM »
Tell the exact purpose for which you want Na+ ions.

Offline jdurg

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2004, 11:33:18 AM »
You CANNOT have an aqueous solution where only positive, or only negative, ions exist.  The laws of physics will NEVER allow that to happen.  Also, the idea about the "gas phase" will not work since you would need to boil the metal in order to get its ion in a gas phase, and at that temperature liquid water does not exist.  You will just have to realize that you cannot isolate a positive ion without having a negative ion present to balance the charge.  
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budullewraagh

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2004, 12:08:25 PM »
you could just use a battery to attract anions to one side and cations to another, then use an impermeable material to divide the sections.  the more powerful the battery the better separation you will have.

Offline jdurg

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2004, 10:35:52 PM »
you could just use a battery to attract anions to one side and cations to another, then use an impermeable material to divide the sections.  the more powerful the battery the better separation you will have.

You'd need to at least have a salt-bridge working in order for current to flow.  Otherwise it would be like putting an electrical current through a saturated solution of glucose.  Not too much would happen.   :P
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Offline Winga

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2004, 01:04:09 AM »
How about if I use nano-technology to make a selective permeable membrane to separate the ions.

Offline Mitch

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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2004, 02:34:16 AM »
Depending on the reaction, it'll probably just act as a spectator ion.
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Re:How can I isolate one form of ions from a solution?
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2004, 04:48:16 AM »
you could consider plasma gas..
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