October 25, 2020, 03:08:05 PM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: How can i produce nitric acid using ammonia?  (Read 2933 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Abdel

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
How can i produce nitric acid using ammonia?
« on: October 03, 2015, 09:15:39 PM »
Hi everyone
I have to produce nitric acid using ammonia NH3 (other fertilizers like sodium nitrate NaNO3 & so are unavailable)
I need your advices to do that.
Notes:
1-If it must be based on catalytic oxidation, please give me other choices than platinum & expensive ones.
2-I need to concentrate it so I know I have to use hydrogen peroxide H2O2 instead of water.. but what I don't understand exactly is how concentrated must it be? (I am not sure of my calculus result, but I suppose the needed concentration is 50%) & how can I prepare it? (I read about doing it by heating NaHCO3 to produce Na2O2 as a first step, then solve it in concentrated sulphuric acid H2SO4)
If any above-mentioned information is wrong, please correct it.
Sincerely, Dr.Thrax

Offline Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Posts: 26056
  • Mole Snacks: +1698/-402
  • Gender: Male
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: How can i produce nitric acid using ammonia?
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2015, 05:41:09 AM »
No way to make it cheaper than the one you can buy, unless you are ready to invest a lot of money into the installation.
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Offline Abdel

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
Re: How can i produce nitric acid using ammonia?
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2015, 07:35:47 AM »
No way to make it cheaper than the one you can buy, unless you are ready to invest a lot of money into the installation.
1- But I don't talk of making it that cheaper. I mean industrially it can be prepared using nitrate salts, so palatine has nothing to do with here. Thus it can be cheaper than the one produced using ammonia. I just need an available & cheaper catalyst.
I read on the link below that I can use copper as a catalyst!!:
http://www.chem.umass.edu/demonstrations/chemReactions5_4.html
2-I have another question: can I instead burn ammonia using for example an Oxygen rich environment?..
3-I recalculated the concentration of Hydrogen peroxide needed, starting with the reaction equation:
If we use water, we get this result 2NO2 + H2O = HNO3 + HNO2
One thing to say, is that i don't really know how can i calculate its concentration here, but i guess it is about 57.27%..
If we use hydrogen peroxide, we get the result below:
2NO2 + H2O2 = 2HNO3
So apparently, I need a pure hydrogen peroxide.. Can i get a 100% concentrated peroxide??!!
Alternatively, can I use a strong oxidant such as potassium chlorate KClO3?

Cheers Dr.Thrax
« Last Edit: October 04, 2015, 08:43:15 AM by Abdel »

Offline thelastone

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 28
  • Mole Snacks: +2/-0
Re: How can i produce nitric acid using ammonia?
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2015, 12:05:22 PM »
Ok I can give my opinion (I could be mistaken):

1.-It's stated that copper can work, yes, but there is no data on the performance of the reaction (imagine that with platinum you've got a 60% and with copper a 10%).

2.-Yes you could. But wouldn't it be cost prohibitive?

3.-100% peroxide? No you cannot, and even if you could, you should stabilise the Hydrogen peroxid solution with either Phosphoric acid or a mix of acetic acid + peracetic, having an acid in the game and rendering the synthesis useless?

I've no idea on the KClO3, sorry.

Offline Enthalpy

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3596
  • Mole Snacks: +295/-57
Re: How can i produce nitric acid using ammonia?
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2015, 08:26:49 PM »
Pure hydrogen peroxide doesn't exist. Concentrations like 98% do exist and are used for some rockets but are damned dangerous. Expect high-grade peroxide to fully detonate upon contact with nearly anything, including a little bit of ammonia.

Sponsored Links