August 13, 2020, 10:46:02 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Vaporizing h2o2 in a humidifier?  (Read 3833 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Trees

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
Vaporizing h2o2 in a humidifier?
« on: November 01, 2015, 11:51:51 AM »
Is it possible to vaporize a hydrogen peroxide solution while maintaining the h2o2? How quickly will the h2o2 break down into oxygen and water? I am wondering if it is possible to produce a sterilizing mist fog with a basic ultra sonic humidifier bought at Walgreens.

Offline Arkcon

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7360
  • Mole Snacks: +533/-147
Re: Vaporizing h2o2 in a humidifier?
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2015, 04:32:30 PM »
I don't think hydrogen peroxide is that stable thermally.  That's probably for the best, because a peroxide mist seems way more toxic than disinfecting mist needs to be.  I suppose the cool mist humidifiers are gentle enough, but dispersed away from its stabilizers, the H2O2 is likely going to break down before its much use.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline Enthalpy

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3530
  • Mole Snacks: +291/-57
Re: Vaporizing h2o2 in a humidifier?
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2015, 08:05:09 PM »
Hi Trees,

If you produce a mist, the peroxide stays mainly liquid and every droplet should keep a little bit of stabilizer, so tehre is hope to keep a low-concentration peroxide for some time...

But are you sure to guess properly how unhealthy this nasty thing is, even at low concentration?

In contact with peroxide, your skin turns white quickly. This results from absorption by the skin and subsequent release of oxygen that creates embolism in your flesh's vessels.

Now, are you really really sure you want to produce a mist that you're likely to inhalate in your lungs?

I wouldn't.

Offline Intanjir

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 219
  • Mole Snacks: +45/-1
Re: Vaporizing h2o2 in a humidifier?
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2015, 10:02:38 PM »
H2O2 seems like a poor choice for an antimicrobial mist. It acts against microbes via the general ease of its chemical reaction. Applying it as a mist now lets the whole room experience its reactions... so expect the furniture to fade and maybe some acceleration of rust.


Sponsored Links