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Topic: In the reaction H2SO4 + H2O= HSO4 + H3O, which are the two Bronsted acids?  (Read 44693 times)

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Blonde

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I really need help.
My graduation is riding on this chemistry work.

1. In the reaction H2SO4 + H2O= HSO4 + H3O, which are the two Bronsted acids?

2. The K[a] for the first ionization stage of HxPO4 may be expressed as..?

3.If the concentration of CHsCOO- were increased, then the equilibrium point would shift..

[a] to the left
to the right
[c] in niether direction.


If someone knows these, please help.

« Last Edit: April 30, 2006, 08:22:36 PM by Mitch »

Offline Equi

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Re: I'm sooo confused..
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2006, 01:58:55 PM »
I really need help.
My graduation is riding on this chemistry work.

1. In the reaction H2SO4 + H2O= HSO4 + H3O, which are the two Bronsted acids?

2. The K[a] for the first ionization stage of HxPO4 may be expressed as..?

3.If the concentration of CHsCOO- were increased, then the equilibrium point would shift..

[a] to the left
to the right
[c] in niether direction.


If someone knows these, please help.

1. Which reaction partner is donating and which is accepting the proton? (Changes on either side of the reaction arrows)
2. Maybe, the pKa? What do you think?
3. That depends on how you formulate the Equation. If it's "HAc <=> H+ + Ac-" then the reaction would shift to the left.
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Offline tennis freak

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to answer the first question the two bronsted acids are the ones that donate a proton. so in this they would have to be H2SO4 and H3O.
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Offline syko sykes

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to answer the first question the two bronsted acids are the ones that donate a proton. so in this they would have to be H2SO4 and H3O.
well, H3O doesn't actually donate a proton, it is the conjugate acid of water which is acting like a base in this scenario
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Ref: http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=9037.0
4.) Please show that you've at least attempted the problem.  We don't mind helping you solve problems but we are ethically opposed to doing homework for you. Violators will have their topic deleted or locked.

6.) Saying something like, "I don't get kinetics can you explain it to me?", or "My teacher sucks can you explain quantum mechanics?" will get you no responses on this forum. It's not that we don't want to help you; it’s that your question is too broad. You need to have very concise questions about kinetics or quantum mechanics in order for us to help you.

Blonde, I gave you the benefit of the doubt twice. I am locking this thread. If your graduation indeed rides on this chemistry question, please start prepare for your graduation by listing the definition of Bronsted acid/base, understand Le Chatelier's Principle, and find out what is the general Ka expression from your textbook or google. This forum aims to help you learn, ie. to help you find the answer, and not actually provide the answer. "Give a man a fish; you have fed him for today. Teach a man to fish; and you have fed him for a lifetime" is one of the founding principles of this forum.
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