December 11, 2019, 11:17:21 AM
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Topic: How to structure the introduction to an Honours Thesis/dissertation  (Read 1665 times)

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Offline maydengar

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Specifically in relation to the introduction of science research papers, what exactly is written in the space after one finishes defining the gap in research and before the specific aims and methodologies of the current paper is stated?

I'm guessing it would be some sort of overarching thesis statement. Would this thesis statement summarize the research gap, or propose new research/novel solution or address the overall objectives/purpose of the paper? The problem is that from all the papers I've read I can't abstract out any reliable or rational way of setting up the thesis statement and understanding what it is.

Offline Dan

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Re: How to structure the introduction to an Honours Thesis/dissertation
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2016, 04:19:29 AM »
Here is (what I think) is a good general approach:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hmi0T1NCX2w
My research: Google Scholar and Researchgate

Offline Albrecht

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Re: How to structure the introduction to an Honours Thesis/dissertation
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2019, 05:04:18 AM »
Specifically in relation to the introduction of science research papers, what exactly is written in the space after one finishes defining the gap in research and before the specific aims and methodologies of the current paper is stated?

I'm guessing it would be some sort of overarching thesis statement. Would this thesis statement summarize the research gap, or propose new research/novel solution to pay for dissertation or address the overall objectives/purpose of the paper? The problem is that from all the papers I've read I can't abstract out any reliable or rational way of setting up the thesis statement and understanding what it is.


Hello,

A central hypothesis should be vivid in your introduction. I studied Chemistry at UNIMELB. My mentor was Terry Mulhern, a PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in the School of Biomedical Sciences. Here's a booklet I used for my dissertation this year: https://services.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/470908/Study-Honours-booklet1.pdf

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