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Topic: organic  (Read 4116 times)

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nitisha

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organic
« on: August 11, 2004, 08:25:35 AM »
When optically pure 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol was subjected to dehydration, a mixture of 2 alkenes was obtained.   HYdrogeneation of these alkenes gave 2,3-dimethylbutane which was 50% optically pure. What were the 2 alkenes formed in the elimination reaction and what were the relative amounts of each?

I'm stuck at the beginning  :-[ someone please help.

Offline movies

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Re:organic
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2004, 06:22:46 PM »
Umm...are you sure the question is right?  2,3-Dimethyl-2-butanol isn't chiral so the question doesn't really make sense.

GCT

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Re:organic
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2004, 08:44:33 PM »
Since the final product is 2,3-dimethylbutane we know that the disubstitued alkene was the major or sole product formjed, either in cis or in trans...you figure out the rest.

Quote
Umm...are you sure the question is right?  2,3-Dimethyl-2-butanol isn't chiral so the question doesn't really make sense.

The molecule has two chiral centers.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2004, 08:45:44 PM by GCT »

Offline Mitch

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Re:organic
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2004, 11:59:43 PM »
The molecule has no chiral centers. Molecule is attached.
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