September 21, 2021, 07:26:54 AM
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Topic: Why does ammonia show condensation with formaldehyde and acetone?  (Read 4406 times)

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kaif87

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Why does ammonia show condensation with formaldehyde and acetone?

I have looked in many books but i couldnt find any which explain why its shows condensation reaction.Please help me!

Demotivator

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Re:Why does ammonia show condensation with formaldehyde and acetone?
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2004, 11:55:50 AM »
This site might help
http://www.rhodium.ws/chemistry/reductive.amination.html

"Ammonia reacts with aldehydes and ketones to form compounds called imines (a condensation reaction with the elimination of water). The first step is a nucleophilic addition to the carbonyl group followed by a rapid proton transfer. The resulting product, a hemiaminal, also sometimes called a carbinolamine, is generally unstable and cannot be isolated. A second reaction occurs in which water is eliminated from the hemiaminal and imine is formed."


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