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Topic: Moles of atom in equation same as moles of equation?  (Read 1674 times)

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Offline llevene

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Moles of atom in equation same as moles of equation?
« on: September 24, 2016, 08:09:07 PM »
Sorry if this is a dumb question, but basically if you had say 2 moles of NaCl, would that mean that you would have 2 moles of Na and 2 moles of Cl in that equation. I just started taking AP Chem and basically we are getting rid of the "bystander" reactants; but the values of moles stay the same right? For example, I have a question which involves .05 mol of Pb(NO3)2 and then when we get rid of the NO3 which is the "bystander" do I still have .05 moles of Pb?
Thanks in advance any help much appreciated!

Offline Borek

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Re: Moles of atom in equation same as moles of equation?
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2016, 03:25:12 AM »
Assuming I understand correctly what you are asking about - yes. This is just a matter of mass conservation, nothing appears out of nowhere and nothing disappears.

And - again assuming I understand you correctly - we call them "spectators", not bystanders (even if I got what you mean by the latter, using a standard nomenclature makes it easier for others to follow you).
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Offline llevene

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Re: Moles of atom in equation same as moles of equation?
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2016, 07:44:35 AM »
ok thanks and srry for saying bystander i completely forgot that they were called spectators
but yea that answered my question! :D

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