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Topic: Theory of selforganisation?  (Read 11442 times)

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Offline mir

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Theory of selforganisation?
« on: April 12, 2006, 12:43:25 PM »
Do someone know about this theory?

I would be interested in knowing the theory in greater detail, in connection with the ecosystm on Earth.

The theory says briefly, that a system (earth) under influence of a energysource (the sun), will organise the excess energy (hadley-cells) away from the system.

Could the excess energy be transforme dinto high-entropic coumpounds like proteins, and by that way be the reason for life?
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Offline Mitch

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2006, 01:13:26 PM »
Thermodynamically speaking, entropy always increases in the direction of heat flow. I doubt the above statement was made by a chemist.
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Offline mir

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2006, 04:23:01 AM »
Thermodynamically speaking, entropy always increases in the direction of heat flow. I doubt the above statement was made by a chemist.

Well, I agrre. But the theory is based on an experiment. And I guess we are not talking about more than an interval in the temperaturescale. I heard about the theory from University of Oslo's webpage about philosophy. I guess its not more than philosophy still.

The experiment: They had a discshaped pool full of water, around two metres. The bottom was smooth and was heated to a certain point. At that ponit the water transported the heat around in the pool in cells of currents having the shape of honeycombs.

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Fragment to fragment clings, and thus they grow
Until we know and name them.
Then by degrees they change and are no more
The things we know.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2006, 03:34:00 PM »
Theory of Self Organisation: Things will get done by itself. If I don't do it, someone will. LOL.
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Offline mir

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2006, 03:43:50 PM »
But is it possible for water to behave in such a fashion of way?

You know about the hadley cells? When it is possible in big scale (the atmosphere), why not a pool of water?
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Fragment to fragment clings, and thus they grow
Until we know and name them.
Then by degrees they change and are no more
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Offline Borek

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2006, 04:42:12 PM »
Entropy increases, you just have to define system. Pool+surroundings in the quoted case, not just pool.
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Offline mir

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2006, 04:52:10 AM »
Of course...  ;D
End of case. Now I can sleep well again.
No single thing abides, but all things flow.
Fragment to fragment clings, and thus they grow
Until we know and name them.
Then by degrees they change and are no more
The things we know.
- Titus Lucretius Carus

http://www.ife.no

Offline xiankai

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2006, 10:24:34 AM »
At that point the water transported the heat around in the pool in cells of currents having the shape of honeycombs.

if that is the general shape of the currents, then it seems so from a macroscopical point of view i guess. microscopically speaking, it would be much more different.
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Offline mir

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2006, 10:30:13 AM »
if that is the general shape of the currents, then it seems so from a macroscopical point of view i guess. microscopically speaking, it would be much more different.

The current is visual through reflecting light on the surface in a certain angle. They were about 20 cm across.
This system is apparently comparible with the earth-sun system. And that is the reason why philosphers is using it as one of the argument against intelligent design.
No single thing abides, but all things flow.
Fragment to fragment clings, and thus they grow
Until we know and name them.
Then by degrees they change and are no more
The things we know.
- Titus Lucretius Carus

http://www.ife.no

Offline FeLiXe

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2006, 04:23:48 PM »
I would say the earth was designed by God in such an intelligent way that it looks like it can be explained by science ...
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Offline mir

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Re: Theory of selforganisation?
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2006, 05:06:07 AM »
I would say the earth was designed by God in such an intelligent way that it looks like it can be explained by science ...

Dont let us discuss religion. Nothing get out of it.
No single thing abides, but all things flow.
Fragment to fragment clings, and thus they grow
Until we know and name them.
Then by degrees they change and are no more
The things we know.
- Titus Lucretius Carus

http://www.ife.no

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