June 21, 2021, 03:06:13 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Flue gas generation  (Read 5390 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mbeychok

  • Chemist
  • Regular Member
  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Mole Snacks: +17/-3
  • Gender: Male
  • Chemical engineer
    • Air Pollution Dispersion Modeling
Flue gas generation
« on: May 29, 2006, 07:57:57 PM »
Here are some typical flue gas generation data for burning natural gas or fuel oil or coal.  It is interesting to note that the flue gas generation for the three different fuels ranges from 11,600 to 12,714 standard cubic feet of wet flue gas which only amounts to a 10 percent difference.  The data were obtained by stoichiometric calculations.
 


Milton Beychok
(Visit me at www.air-dispersion.com)
Milton Beychok
(Visit me at www.air-dispersion.com)

Offline Donaldson Tan

  • Editor, New Asia Republic
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3178
  • Mole Snacks: +261/-13
  • Gender: Male
    • New Asia Republic
Re: Flue gas generation
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2006, 10:58:56 PM »
I am curious what is the point of these calculations.

Are they for designing SNOX plants?
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline mbeychok

  • Chemist
  • Regular Member
  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Mole Snacks: +17/-3
  • Gender: Male
  • Chemical engineer
    • Air Pollution Dispersion Modeling
Re: Flue gas generation
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2006, 01:13:43 AM »
Geodome:

The idea was to demonstrate to people interested in a quick, approximate estimate of the amount of flue gas being emitted to the atmosphere by a fossil-fueled heater/furnace/power plant steam generator/ etc. that they could use 11,600 to 12,700 scf per million Btu of fuel burned (where scf means cubic feet of flue gas at 60 °F and 1 atmosphere) ... and probably be within 10% of the true value for their specific fuel.

That range of values translates to 295 to 320 Nm3 per GJ of fuel burned (where  Nm3 means Normal cubic metres of flue gas at 0 °C and 1 atmosphere).

Who is interested in such data? Anyone interested in performing an air pollution modeling study of the flue gases from one or more of their plant's fired heaters. Also, anyone thinking of installing some type of pollution control system on their flue gases and needing to know the flue gas emission rate in order to size the pollution control equipment. Or anyone wanting to recover some of the waste heat being emitted with those flue gases. 
Milton Beychok
(Visit me at www.air-dispersion.com)

Sponsored Links