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Topic: Negative Ions Act As Bases  (Read 5896 times)

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Offline FouRRaW

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Negative Ions Act As Bases
« on: June 01, 2006, 10:07:59 PM »
I have a question in the textbook. 

How do all negative ions act as bases??

Does anybody have a link to a site i could find the answer? Or a hint?

Thanks


Offline Mitch

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Re: Negative Ions Act As Bases
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2006, 10:11:47 PM »
HSO4- would only act like a base depending on the pH of the solution. ;)
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Offline FouRRaW

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Re: Negative Ions Act As Bases
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2006, 10:32:47 PM »
Is that smartass response??
I really don't know actually.

Or is it a hint?

Offline mike

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Re: Negative Ions Act As Bases
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2006, 10:54:41 PM »
It may also depend on which definition of base you mean....
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Offline FouRRaW

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Re: Negative Ions Act As Bases
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2006, 11:05:15 PM »
I gues it'd be the bronsted-lowry definition.  A base is a molecule or ion that can accept a H+ proton.


Offline FouRRaW

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Re: Negative Ions Act As Bases
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2006, 11:20:17 PM »
Cause i can't just say a negative ion acts as a base by accepting a H+ ion, can i?

Offline Mitch

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Re: Negative Ions Act As Bases
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2006, 11:24:26 PM »
Is that smartass response??

Not that time.
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Offline wereworm73

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Re: Negative Ions Act As Bases
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2006, 12:29:31 AM »
Whenever acids & bases are mentioned, they're usually the Bronsted-Lowry type (H+ donors & acceptors).  You might also hear about Lewis acids & bases, which involve donors/acceptors of electrons instead of H+, but these will be refered to as "Lewis acids" or "Lewis bases" (or often in organic chemistry, "electrophiles" & "nucleophiles") rather than simply "acids" or "bases" (unless your chemistry teacher or textbook happens to be fiendishly ambiguous  :P ).

Anions of strong acids--like HSO4-, Cl- & NO3---won't accept H+, at least not to any significant degree.  So, not all negative ions will act as a (Bronsted-Lowry) base.
 
 

Offline mike

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Re: Negative Ions Act As Bases
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2006, 12:53:10 AM »
Quote
at least not to any significant degree

This may be the sticking point for some people though ;)
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