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Topic: Comparing HCl H2SO4 and HNO3  (Read 18504 times)

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Offline bramgo

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Comparing HCl H2SO4 and HNO3
« on: June 07, 2006, 07:56:48 PM »
Hi,

this is one more question. I need to be able to know the answer to this. But it's the kind of question that has no clear certain answer:

I was asked: "Compare the following acids: HCl, H2SO4, HNO3 to eachother! What are their main differences."

I think the answer is:
All 3 acids are strong ones.  
HCl is a gas and not a strong oxidator.
H2SO4 and HNO3 are strong oxidators and liquids.
HNO3 reacts stronger with low-reactive metals than the other 2 acids.

Are the things I'm claiming correct? And are there other things worth mentioning?

Thank you in advance !

Offline xiankai

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Re: Comparing HCl H2SO4 and HNO3
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2006, 10:11:26 PM »
HCl in gaseous state, is not an acid.

H2SO4 is not a strong oxidiser. To oxidise, it must be reduced. And to what can it be reduced? from S6+ to S4+? now thats very hard, since you need to reverse the spontaneous reaction of formation of SO4. well i dont know much about sulfur, but sulfuric acid is not a strong oxidiser.

the acids are not really liquids, they are simply compounds in aqueous state, just like aqueous HCl as opposed to gaseous HCl.

Last statement seems alright, HNO3 is the strongest oxidiser of them all, and metals are more easily oxidised than reduced.
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Offline Will

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Re: Comparing HCl H2SO4 and HNO3
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2006, 10:46:33 PM »
HCl in gaseous state, is not an acid.

Well it depends which definition of an acid you use. It can still 'donate' a proton to gaseous ammonia for example.

H2SO4 is not a strong oxidiser. To oxidise, it must be reduced. And to what can it be reduced? from S6+ to S4+? now thats very hard, since you need to reverse the spontaneous reaction of formation of SO4. well i dont know much about sulfur, but sulfuric acid is not a strong oxidiser.

the acids are not really liquids, they are simply compounds in aqueous state, just like aqueous HCl as opposed to gaseous HCl.

Sulfuric acis is a relatively strong oxidiser- it can oxidise hydrogen halides to the corresponding halogen and can oxidise carbon to carbon dioxide and sulfur to sulfur to sulfur dioxide, not to mention sulfuric acid's reactions with copper and zinc...

100% sulfuric and nitric acids are colourless liquids.

One special characteristic of sulfuric acid is its dehydrating power. It can can react with sugars to give carbon- it is quite a cool reaction.

xiankai: what is SO4? I have never heard of it before, please tell me more :). My guess is its S(O2)2 (oxygen as peroxide), but I've never heard of it before.

Offline Borek

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Re: Comparing HCl H2SO4 and HNO3
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2006, 03:23:38 AM »
the acids are not really liquids, they are simply compounds in aqueous state

Both pure H2SO4 and pure HNO3 are liquid in room temperature. Melting point for sulfuric acid is 10.49 °C, for nitric acid -42 °C.
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