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Topic: Anyone heard back from schools yet? [2009 edition]  (Read 36399 times)

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Offline theo

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Re: Anyone heard back from schools yet? [2009 edition]
« Reply #45 on: May 14, 2009, 11:01:07 PM »
Couldn't find a website when I applied. I ended up emailing some of the departments to ask for averages. Cornell and NU directed me to their websites. Stanford emailed me with these scores: 3.7 GPA, 636 verbal, 774 quantitative, 5.0 analytical writing, 805 chemistry subject exam.

I'm not sure if this is helpful but getting profs who are alumni of the schools to write your recommendation letters may help... Of course you must have worked with them/aced their course etc. 


Offline Wildcat08

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Re: Anyone heard back from schools yet? [2009 edition]
« Reply #46 on: May 21, 2009, 06:55:18 PM »
Any other tips for someone applying to graduate school? 

Offline theo

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Re: Anyone heard back from schools yet? [2009 edition]
« Reply #47 on: May 21, 2009, 09:44:46 PM »
Spend some time studying for the GRE chemistry
I spent 6 weeks and it definitely wasn't enough. Also, don't underestimate the importance of the GRE general.

State clearly what you are interested in (laser spectroscopy, mass spectrometry etc) and try to tie your interests to the interests' of the school's faculty members.
I was advised to do so in my statement of intent by some of my profs. Was also told to mention about 3 names (just in case two of them are not taking in new students)

Can't seem to think of anything else to say... Is there any other specific questions that you may have? 



Offline 408

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Re: Anyone heard back from schools yet? [2009 edition]
« Reply #48 on: May 21, 2009, 10:21:53 PM »
Talk to who you want to work with ahead of time.  Its a waste to go to a school only for its name and not for the research you want to do.  Convince your prospective supervisor you would be an asset and they can usually grease the gears of academia.

Offline Agent-X

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Re: Anyone heard back from schools yet? [2009 edition]
« Reply #49 on: July 02, 2009, 01:13:51 AM »
If I were to take two courses, I could go to UIUC. Somehow astrology (as a QII course) is relevant to being a bio major *sarcasm*. The other course would be a non-western course (I took world religions; UIUC didn't call it equivalent -- pricks; it was taught by an Christian priest for God's sake. *irony*). World religions and philosophy in general are nice to know when talking about contemporary/moral issues in biology.

Think I should take them to go to UIUC?
I did apply, and I was sent a rejection/apology letter in the mail.

Other than that, I was sent something by MIT and told to apply.
It was a... what's that called... fortune teller. Some silly oragami fortune teller.
To say the least, I wanted to burn it or eat it. I wasn't sure what to do with it.
It seems like the only reason that place is around is because of mobocrats and government investment.

Technically, even if I took calc and physics, they wouldn't let me in because I'm beyond sophomore year.
Same thing for UofC. I wouldn't be able to afford UofC, and it kind of personifies the lack of religion and morality in the midwest with many of its students spouting atheistic propaganda.

Northwestern would make me retake courses, which I don't feel like taking second semester English again: It's all subjective *insert expletive*.

I sometimes wonder if I should try to raise my standards above UIC. The school is in the ghetto. Lots of violent muggings. Loyola Chicago accepted me, but it's got a 20% graduation rate, which is disturbing.

Personally, I don't really like how the public educational system is working. There is too much bias with diversification of funds. It all makes me want to move to California.

What bothers me is that even at undergrad, it seems like there isn't too much research to do until you cover the basics. I guess I could sit around watching lab mice do funny things. But I might not be able to do a toxicology report on them.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2009, 01:33:52 AM by Agent-X »
Intermittent SFN member. Former RS member. Washu is the bomb.

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