December 07, 2019, 05:47:33 PM
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Topic: Physical Chemsitry; which physics?  (Read 5548 times)

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Offline KillerWhale2020

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Physical Chemsitry; which physics?
« on: December 24, 2017, 11:51:45 PM »
Hey guys,

I was wondering if algebra based physics will be useful or I will be in a disadvantage? I’m doing a minor in chemsitry and math. So I’m not sure when I will take PCHEM. Probably after partial differential equations I will take it. I’m hoping to take it in fall 2019 or spring 2020.im a tranafer student who recently changed major to biology.

Thanks,
Christian
I'm a student studying Biology with Chemistry and Mathematics minor. I'm hoping to proceed a career in Atmospheric Chemistry.

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Physical Chemsitry; which physics?
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2017, 06:11:26 AM »
Physics is minor important in this case. Important is to have a bride scale and experience in mathematics.

Offline KillerWhale2020

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Re: Physical Chemsitry; which physics?
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2017, 12:02:01 AM »
Should I take the class or self-study it? My goal is to take the GRE Chemistry. So it doesn't matter which physics I take?
I'm a student studying Biology with Chemistry and Mathematics minor. I'm hoping to proceed a career in Atmospheric Chemistry.

Offline orgo814

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Re: Physical Chemsitry; which physics?
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2018, 12:55:18 PM »
From my experience taking physical chemistry, it is mostly important that you have a strong background in general chemistry and calculus (through calc 3). If you have that background, you should be fine and any "physical concepts" you could probably self-study as they come up.

Offline pcm81

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Re: Physical Chemsitry; which physics?
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2018, 10:47:52 PM »
Hey guys,

I was wondering if algebra based physics will be useful or I will be in a disadvantage? I’m doing a minor in chemsitry and math. So I’m not sure when I will take PCHEM. Probably after partial differential equations I will take it. I’m hoping to take it in fall 2019 or spring 2020.im a tranafer student who recently changed major to biology.

Thanks,
Christian

Disclaimer: I have never taken physical chemistry, but...
Having an M.Sc. in physics and having read the wikipedia article on physical chemistry, it sounds to me that physical chemistry is nothing more than a subset of physics for a "molecular scale dynamics and related phenomena" written in a language familiar to a chemistry department. Hence i would recommend the same background information as i would consider necessary for that subset of physics.

Calculus and differential equations will basically establish the language to describe the phenomena on that scale.
Some linear algebra may help in linearisation and discretisation of the more complex problems.
Basic physics introduce you to concepts of energy and momentum and mass, force, electro-magnetism, basic concepts of quantum mechanics, diffraction and other wave phenomena (2 semesters of sophmore level physics). More advanced physics rephrase all these concepts in language of calculus. A subset of the "more advanced physics" that is on the molecular scale sounds like physical chemistry.
Sounds to me like a junior level course with pre-reqs being calculus (2-3 semesters), differential equations (1 semester) general physics (2 semesters) and general chemistry (2 semesters).

Just my $0.02, take it for what it's worth.

Offline orgo814

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Re: Physical Chemsitry; which physics?
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2018, 06:59:54 PM »
I did not feel a physics background was necessary to understand physical chemistry. Simply having a strong background in general chemistry and knowing some calculus is fine. Good luck!

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