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Topic: A question about elements that are under Argon  (Read 7693 times)

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Offline CGB_Spender

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A question about elements that are under Argon
« on: June 20, 2006, 02:40:01 PM »
I see that many compnies that sell elements, they put them in an ampoule, under Argon for avoid oxidation. My question is why ONLY under Argon? Are any other gases that have the same results with Argon, against oxidation? Why they put them under Argon and they dont put the elements,in an amboulle that has not atmospheric air at all. Without atmospheric air, you have not the danger of oxidation, and you save money. Thanks.? :)

Offline Mitch

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Re: A question about elements that are under Argon
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2006, 02:47:53 PM »
Argon is the most abundant noble gas, so it makes sense in that respect.
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Offline CGB_Spender

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Re: A question about elements that are under Argon
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2006, 02:53:19 PM »
Ok, i understand why they use Argon and not other noble gases, BUT why not in an ampoule without atmosperic air at all ?  ??? This would be cheaper and you solve the problem of oxidation once for all.

Offline Borek

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Re: A question about elements that are under Argon
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2006, 03:51:47 PM »
No, it is not cheaper nor easier to seal the glass ampoule in vacuum. It can be done, but it is much easier and much more (economically) feasible to use inert atmosphere of the same pressure as external when doing such things.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: A question about elements that are under Argon
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2006, 07:47:58 PM »
You are suggesting to use a vacuum inside the glass bulb instead of using an inert gas. This would be mechanically unstable for the glass bulb. You might need thicker glass to compensate for atmospheric pressure acting on the bulb.

Nitrogen gas is an alternative to Argon FYI.
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Re: A question about elements that are under Argon
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2006, 08:58:40 AM »
Geo, it depends whats being stored under there, Li metal for example, will react with N2, to form, surprisingly enough, lithium nitride ;D

Activated, monatomic nitrogen is another matter, produced by passing N2 through a tube with a corona discharge, produces explosive nitrides from some transition metals, and is reactive as hell.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: A question about elements that are under Argon
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2006, 02:17:20 PM »
Yes, nitrogen gas is not employed for storing group 1 metal.

the concept is to provide an inert and a mechanically stable environment.
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