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Topic: States in Reactions  (Read 1575 times)

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Offline -_-zzzz

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States in Reactions
« on: October 26, 2018, 10:07:38 AM »
Hey guys,

In chemical reactions involving metals, why do we say they are in the solid state (e.g Na (s))?

Thanks in advance.

Offline sjb

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Re: States in Reactions
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2018, 10:25:14 AM »
We don't, not always - but what would you suggest we use instead?

Offline -_-zzzz

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Re: States in Reactions
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2018, 06:27:44 PM »
We don't, not always - but what would you suggest we use instead?

Thanks for the response! Although I’m just confused as to why we use any state  because there are no interactions between sodium atoms for any “state” to exist.

Offline jeffmoonchop

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Re: States in Reactions
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2018, 07:09:49 PM »
There are always interactions. Its a solid because the atoms are static due to ionic interactions. If you heat it up to 98C the interactions break and the atoms begin to move. Now its a liquid. Keep heating up to 883C and the interactions keeping the atoms close together are broken and atoms begin to leave the liquid. Its boiling and becoming a gas. Go back to basics, bonding.

Offline wildfyr

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Re: States in Reactions
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2018, 08:38:24 PM »
Quote
Its a solid because the atoms are static due to ionic interactions.

Just to make an important distinction here, the interactions in sodium solid are not ionic. That only occurs between formally charged species. The interactions due to metallic bonding. Wikipedia defines it thusly:

Metallic bonding is an extremely delocalized communal form of electron deficient covalent bonding.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallic_bonding#The_nature_of_metallic_bonding

Offline -_-zzzz

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Re: States in Reactions
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2018, 01:18:50 AM »
Quote
Its a solid because the atoms are static due to ionic interactions.

Just to make an important distinction here, the interactions in sodium solid are not ionic. That only occurs between formally charged species. The interactions due to metallic bonding. Wikipedia defines it thusly:

Metallic bonding is an extremely delocalized communal form of electron deficient covalent bonding.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallic_bonding#The_nature_of_metallic_bonding

Hey there! When solid sodium undergoes a redox reaction with chlorine gas (Cl2), why do we say that the sodium atoms are oxidised? Because there are no sodium "atoms" in solid sodium.

Offline Borek

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Re: States in Reactions
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2018, 03:48:33 AM »
Hey there! When solid sodium undergoes a redox reaction with chlorine gas (Cl2), why do we say that the sodium atoms are oxidised? Because there are no sodium "atoms" in solid sodium.

Have you read my answer in your other thread?

Yes, there are sodium atoms in the solid sodium.
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