March 02, 2024, 06:58:31 PM
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Topic: Can two phenols form an ether(diphenyl ether)under the presence of sulfuric acid  (Read 1931 times)

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Offline Varlam

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is there any possibility or conditions that allow two phenols to form an ether(diphenyl ether).

Offline wildfyr

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Why are you so insistent on learning how to produce polydiphenylether, and apparently doing it without using an aryl dibromide?

The answer to this question, once again, is no. You need an electrophilic partner.

I'm an industrial polymer and organic chemist. Short of finding a chemist who directly works at a factory producing this, you will not find a more informed answer.

Offline Varlam

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Why are you so insistent on learning how to produce polydiphenylether, and apparently doing it without using an aryl dibromide?

The answer to this question, once again, is no. You need an electrophilic partner.

I'm an industrial polymer and organic chemist. Short of finding a chemist who directly works at a factory producing this, you will not find a more informed answer.
I forgot about that question. Now my interest is that can two phenols undergo dehydration? Because we know that two alcohols can form an ether by dehydration. so why not two phenols can't form diphenyl ether by dehydration.

Offline wildfyr

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No, two phenols cannot undergo dehydration. At least not without some serious cooking, and I think it would degrade before making an ether.

The reason for this is that you have to break aromaticity to attack at that spot, and that is worth 36 kcal/mol, quite a bit of energy. Whereas for typical alkyl alcohols, there is no energy hump like that to overcome.

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