May 06, 2021, 11:04:52 AM
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Topic: Lithium forms covalent Halides. Why?  (Read 15574 times)

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Offline xstrae

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Re: Lithium forms covalent Halides. Why?
« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2006, 11:07:30 AM »
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since n ? 4 as smallest d subshell is 3d, note that the noble gas configuration is usually larger (in the terms i defined above) than the electronic configuration that u specified, in terms of quantum number and subshell (4s2 4p6 vs 3d4 4s0 for example).

i think 'n' was not meant to take the same value in both the electronic configurations. The atomic radius of Na+1ion is 0.95 A and that of Cu+1 is also the same. I think what was meant is the book is, for two ions of the same size and charge, one with a pseudo noble gas configuration will be more polarising than the cation with a noble gas configuration. So I suppose, CuCl is more covalent than NaCl.

Offline xiankai

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Re: Lithium forms covalent Halides. Why?
« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2006, 11:11:55 AM »
i think 'n' was not meant to take the same value in both the electronic configurations. The atomic radius of Na+1ion is 0.95 A and that of Cu+1 is also the same. I think what was meant is the book is, for two ions of the same size and charge, one with a pseudo noble gas configuration will be more polarising than the cation with a noble gas configuration. So I suppose, CuCl is more covalent than NaCl.

makes sense.
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