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Topic: Gas law homework help.  (Read 1336 times)

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BRITD90

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Gas law homework help.
« on: April 08, 2019, 01:26:56 AM »
A particular balloon is designed by its manufacturer to be to be inflated to a volume no more than 2.5 L. If the balloon is filled with 2.0 L of Helium at sea level and 4°C, is released and rises to an altitude at which the atmospheric pressure is 500. mmHg and -4 °C, will the balloon burst?

I'm having trouble understanding gas law. Do I use the PV=NRT formula?
Also....please help me understand the Calorimetry math for the question below.

 A student masses 5.34 g of NH4Cl, and adds it to a calorimeter containing 100.0 mL of water at 21.0 oC. As the salt dissolves, the temperature drops to 17.6 oC. Calculate the ΔHsol of ammonium chloride in kJ/mol. Is the process endothermic or exothermic? Explain. Density of water 1.00g/mL. Specific heat of water = 4.184 J/g oC

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Re: Gas law homework help.
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2019, 02:42:46 AM »
Do I use the PV=NRT formula?


Yes. Start by calculating number of moles of helium the balloon is filled with.

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A student masses 5.34 g of NH4Cl, and adds it to a calorimeter containing 100.0 mL of water at 21.0 oC. As the salt dissolves, the temperature drops to 17.6 oC. Calculate the ΔHsol of ammonium chloride in kJ/mol. Is the process endothermic or exothermic? Explain. Density of water 1.00g/mL. Specific heat of water = 4.184 J/g oC

Do you know any formulas that can be applied to calorimetry problems?
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BRITD90

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Re: Gas law homework help.
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2019, 02:48:39 AM »
okay by using the PV=NRT formula, I got 0.4342mol. not sure what to do after that.

BRITD90

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Re: Gas law homework help.
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2019, 02:51:15 AM »
also, for calorimetry there is the formula q=mc(change of temp)

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Re: Gas law homework help.
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2019, 04:24:14 AM »
okay by using the PV=NRT formula, I got 0.4342mol. not sure what to do after that.

Please show how you got this number, looks way too high.

also, for calorimetry there is the formula q=mc(change of temp)

Can you use this formula to calculate amount of heat involved in the dissolution?

Temperature dropped - was the process exothermic (producing heat) or endothermic (consuming heat)?
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