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Topic: Periodic table of elements  (Read 328 times)

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Offline prashantakerkar

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Periodic table of elements
« on: May 06, 2019, 11:24:25 PM »
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodic_table

1 Can there be more chemical elements in the future whose atomic number exceeds 118?

So in this case, the periodic table of elements will have additional elements in future ?

2 What is unknown element?
Is it neither a Solid or Liquid or Gas ?
Those elements cannot be classified in any one States of matter?

3 Every element in the table is a square. Will the periodic table look more better if every element is replaced by Circle or any other Geometrical shape in terms of periodic table design look and feel ?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 11:43:16 PM by prashantakerkar »

Offline AWK

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« Last Edit: May 07, 2019, 02:42:21 AM by Borek »
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Offline prashantakerkar

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2019, 04:37:47 AM »

Thank you.

Do you have any views or opinion regarding points 2 & 3 ?

Unknown elements & Geometrical shape of an element in the table.

Do you feel Circle, Diamond, Cone, Kite etc would look nice for the Chemical element?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Offline mjc123

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2019, 05:43:16 AM »
I see no advantage, aesthetic or scientific, in using a different shape for the elements. Squares are ideal because of the two orthogonal relationships of an element - group and period. The periodic table may be regarded as a square lattice on which each element occupies a lattice point. Square boxes are then space-filling, which is useful if you want to include information about the element, e.g. atomic weight, electron configuration etc. Circles, diamonds etc. would leave a lot of white space. And there might be a temptation to try and close-pack them, which would obscure the group-period relationships that the PT displays so well.

Offline P

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2019, 05:44:12 AM »

Geometrical shape of an element in the table.

Do you feel Circle, Diamond, Cone, Kite etc would look nice for the Chemical element?


Whether it would look nice or not is just completely irrelevant to anything that matters with the periodic table. I guess it is squares because that is the easiest way to draw a table - but it would make no absolutely no difference to anyone if they were drawn in as hexagons, heptagons or triangles. Obviously do not use triskaidecagons though - that way lies unfathomable oddness and probable danger.



 
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Offline prashantakerkar

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2019, 05:55:58 AM »

Thank you.

Regarding Point 2, What are your views and opinion?

Why these elements are classified as "Unknown" ?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Offline P

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2019, 06:15:20 AM »
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodic_table
the future whose atomic number exceeds 118?
2 What is unknown element?
Is it neither a Solid or Liquid or Gas ?
Those elements cannot be classified in any one States of matter?


Thank you.

Regarding Point 2, What are your views and opinion?

Why these elements are classified as "Unknown" ?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

They are 'unknown' because they do not occur naturally on earth and don't really exist outside of a scientific experiment. Many of the heavier elements on the periodic table have only ever been observed for mere fractions of a second as that are so extremely unstable, highly reactive and suffer from near instant decay. They are 'unknown' because we have never seen them and have just left space for them in the periodic table where this configuration of protons and electrons could conceivably give a new element.

Regarding 'solid liquid or gas'.  how do you define a femtosecond blip on a screen? Is it a solid, liquid or a gas? It was probably a plasma when it was detected.


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Offline AWK

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2019, 06:37:13 AM »

Thank you.

Regarding Point 2, What are your views and opinion?

Why these elements are classified as "Unknown" ?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Gases in the periodic table are rather over. As to the actual state of matter, I do not see the possibility of examining it. Although quantum computations are carried out, but for the large atomic masses their results have rather an estimated value.
As concerning the shape of the cage for each element - I prefer rather the practical appearance over the artistic one (there are many more interesting artistic objects to watch).
The rectangle or square allows us to place more information than in other shapes. And such a two-sided A4 periodic table allows me to find some needed information faster than through a computer.
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Offline prashantakerkar

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2019, 08:46:52 AM »
Thanks.

I agree with you.

But strangely, the atomic number and atomic mass number is computed and the elements are given a name.

So why one cannot classify those "Unknown" elements as either Solid, Liquid & Gas ?

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Offline Borek

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2019, 09:10:03 AM »
But strangely, the atomic number and atomic mass number is computed and the elements are given a name.

Foe these elements that were produced both atomic mass and atomic number were measured.

As we know atomic number is a just an integer telling how many protons are in the nucleus we can "predict" existence of next elements just like we can "predict" next natural number after 100 is 101.

We don't have large enough samples of these elements to check/measure their properties.
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Offline P

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Re: Periodic table of elements
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2019, 09:14:32 AM »
They are detected via a blip on a screen. You can predict solid liquid or gas at whatever temperature and pressure - but when they are detected I think they are individual atoms that exist for a mere fraction of a second. I 'guess' this state is plasma rather than gas or solid... but I am not sure how you'd define it's state when it is a single ion...  they do not exist naturally.
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