December 01, 2022, 01:21:51 AM
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Topic: Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!  (Read 2232 times)

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Offline empleat

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Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!
« on: May 23, 2022, 02:17:51 PM »
Hello,

I read you are supposed to clean toothbrush after you are done. E.g. with 3% hydrogen peroxide, https://www.insider.com/how-to-clean-toothbrush But 3% hydrogen peroxide has worst rating when it comes to health! Yes you are supposed to clean toothbrush with water, after you clean it in hydrogen peroxide, there is when my question comes: even after thorough rinsing: could 3% hydrogen peroxide still be left on a toothbrush?

Also second question don't know where to post it: the article also says: that droplets from flushing toilet can be found on toothbrush. It is especially problem if you share toilet with a bathroom. This is not case in our home! However I had stored toothbrush in a closet (which is bad also supposedly) aside: where Am I supposed to store it, if I leave it on the open: dust will settle in... Anyways closet is in front of toilet doors like 1 meter away, it is probably impossible to say like that, but is that far away? I probably find somewhere else to store it, anyway I care mostly about first question...

Also there is a mouthwash (for toothbrush cleaning) I have no idea how effective it would compare to 3% hydrogen peroxide, or there is a vinegar, but I read in link in that article, that it doesn't kill every bacteria so I don't know what to pick...

Thanks!

Offline Borek

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Re: Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2022, 02:44:11 PM »
after thorough rinsing: could 3% hydrogen peroxide still be left on a toothbrush?

No, it will get diluted. Besides, hydrogen peroxide evaporates just like water does, and decomposes to water and oxygen. So if the brush is left for several hours to dry chances of finding any hydrogen peroxide in substantial amounts on the surface are next to zero.

Besides, most of such articles about dangers of using everyday objects are just a fear mongering.
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Offline Corribus

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Re: Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2022, 05:19:55 PM »
I think a better question is why you think you need to clean your toothbrush. Toothpaste is already loaded with detergents and your mouth is already loaded with bacteria. You take in bacteria, viruses, and fungi every time you breathe. Most bacteria are harmless when inhaled/ingested.

Seems like a pointless exercise.
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Offline empleat

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Re: Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2022, 05:39:57 PM »
after thorough rinsing: could 3% hydrogen peroxide still be left on a toothbrush?

No, it will get diluted. Besides, hydrogen peroxide evaporates just like water does, and decomposes to water and oxygen. So if the brush is left for several hours to dry chances of finding any hydrogen peroxide in substantial amounts on the surface are next to zero.

Besides, most of such articles about dangers of using everyday objects are just a fear mongering.
Good to know.

It wasn't article about dangers of using every day objects!

This helps thanks, so it is perfect: I can use this easily to clean it. Wait what about unsubstantial? I Am cautious!

I think a better question is why you think you need to clean your toothbrush. Toothpaste is already loaded with detergents and your mouth is already loaded with bacteria. You take in bacteria, viruses, and fungi every time you breathe. Most bacteria are harmless when inhaled/ingested.

Seems like a pointless exercise.
True, but why you clean your hands after toilet then. It is not the same. There are substantial amounts of bacteria located on toothbrush. Read CDC...

Offline Corribus

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Re: Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2022, 06:10:29 PM »
True, but why you clean your hands after toilet then. It is not the same. There are substantial amounts of bacteria located on toothbrush. Read CDC...
For one, fecal bacteria do often spread disease. Also, other people are more likely to be exposed to bacteria on your fingers than those on your toothbrush - i.e., hands are a more likely vector for the spread of human disease than toothbrushes, which are used by a single person. For another, human perception of disgust. If I pee on my hands and prepare your food, is it likely to harm you? Probably not, but most humans would say that's disgusting.

The toothbrush has been in your mouth. The bacteria in your toothbrush most likely came from your mouth. Are you likely to get sick exposing yourself to bacteria that are already in your mouth?

Well, anyway....
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

Offline empleat

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Re: Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2022, 11:54:25 AM »
True, but why you clean your hands after toilet then. It is not the same. There are substantial amounts of bacteria located on toothbrush. Read CDC...
For one, fecal bacteria do often spread disease. Also, other people are more likely to be exposed to bacteria on your fingers than those on your toothbrush - i.e., hands are a more likely vector for the spread of human disease than toothbrushes, which are used by a single person. For another, human perception of disgust. If I pee on my hands and prepare your food, is it likely to harm you? Probably not, but most humans would say that's disgusting.

The toothbrush has been in your mouth. The bacteria in your toothbrush most likely came from your mouth. Are you likely to get sick exposing yourself to bacteria that are already in your mouth?

Well, anyway....
No one was disputing that hands are not more likely vector of spreading diseases, not sure why would you bring it up. It is like to say, because I can get covid, getting influenza is OK... Isn't that what you were trying to say?
You merely extended on what you were already claiming, but ofc. you wouldn't read anything: https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol/faqs/toothbrush-handling.html


 

Offline Borek

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Re: Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2022, 12:30:42 PM »
you wouldn't read anything: https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol/faqs/toothbrush-handling.html

To put the ball in your half: wouldn't hurt if you were reading things you link to. You asked how to disinfect the toothbrush with hydrogen peroxide, you were told it is not actually necessary, than to prove your "point" you linked to the site which says:

Quote
  • After brushing, rinse your toothbrush with tap water until it is completely clean, let it air-dry, and store it in an upright position (...)
  • You do not need to soak toothbrushes in disinfecting solutions or mouthwash, which may actually spread germs under the right conditions.
  • You do not need to use dishwashers, microwaves, or ultraviolet devices to disinfect toothbrushes. These methods may damage the toothbrush.

So, what your point is, again?
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Offline empleat

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Re: Looking for best way to clean toothbrush safely!
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2022, 05:52:52 PM »
you wouldn't read anything: https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol/faqs/toothbrush-handling.html

To put the ball in your half: wouldn't hurt if you were reading things you link to. You asked how to disinfect the toothbrush with hydrogen peroxide, you were told it is not actually necessary, than to prove your "point" you linked to the site which says:

Quote
  • After brushing, rinse your toothbrush with tap water until it is completely clean, let it air-dry, and store it in an upright position (...)
  • You do not need to soak toothbrushes in disinfecting solutions or mouthwash, which may actually spread germs under the right conditions.
  • You do not need to use dishwashers, microwaves, or ultraviolet devices to disinfect toothbrushes. These methods may damage the toothbrush.

So, what your point is, again?
Interestesting! I have chronic pain I read so much stuff, I was researching this like 5 minutes so far :D I thought I read it somewhere, but I didn't remember exactly where.

Point is this guy is annoying, it is one of these which doesn't answer question and wants only to be contrarian (more so in his next post):
Quote
I think a better question is why you think you need to clean your toothbrush. Toothpaste is already loaded with detergents and your mouth is already loaded with bacteria. You take in bacteria, viruses, and fungi every time you breathe. Most bacteria are harmless when inhaled/ingested.

Seems like a pointless exercise.
I don't know actually why you are defending him...

Quote
Various means of cleaning, disinfecting, or sterilizing toothbrushes between uses have been developed, but no published research documents that brushing with a contaminated toothbrush has led to recontamination of a user’s mouth, oral infections, or other adverse health effects.
Seems like it should be ok!

Again thanks for answer...


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