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Topic: Pictures of elements above 83 (Po,At,Rn...)  (Read 28523 times)

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Offline johamb

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Pictures of elements above 83 (Po,At,Rn...)
« on: May 01, 2007, 09:21:46 AM »
Greetings to everyone!

Please, can someone tell me where I can get pictures from the elements (or its compounds)
above the atomic number 83 e.g. Po, Rn (glowing), Np, Pu, Am, Cm, etc.

Reason: I collect pictures and I'd like to make my own periodic table poster
(one source that I have is the Book Matter from Ralph E. Lapp)

Thank's a lot!!

best regards
john


Offline Borek

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Offline P

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Re: Pictures of elements above 83 (Po,At,Rn...)
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2007, 09:47:00 AM »
I typed "Radon Picture" into google and this web site came up:  www.webelements.com

It has pictures of all of the elements if you click on the periodic table. 

regards,


P.


PS:  Borek beat me to it  -   looks like some of their pictures are better than the site a quoted, but it will give you some choice.
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Offline pantone159

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Re: Pictures of elements above 83 (Po,At,Rn...)
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2007, 10:23:14 AM »
I've collected some pictures here:  http://gotexassoccer.com/elements/index.htm

Offline omega54

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Re: Pictures of elements above 83 (Po,At,Rn...)
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2008, 02:19:14 AM »
This should solve yourproblem with ease - enjoy

http://periodictable.com/

Offline pantone159

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Re: Pictures of elements above 83 (Po,At,Rn...)
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2008, 07:59:42 PM »
Theodore Gray's site is indeed wonderful, but it doesn't really show many samples of the actual post-83 elements.  It does have Po (sort of), Th, U and Pu, but that is it.

I am also going to make a petty gripe that, although I emailed him some years ago with the information that a smoke detector is also a neptunium sample in disguise, he now credits somebody else for that information.  Maybe the email got lost in a spam filter or something, though.

Offline omega54

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Re: Pictures of elements above 83 (Po,At,Rn...)
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2008, 11:18:44 PM »
i have heard about this in regards to smk detectors having neptunium, i would just like to have someone with one of these type of detectors to send a photo to me showing that indeed it says neptunium rather than americium, since i mentioned this to others, and they simply will not believe, a photo would put this argument to rest.
so, if there is anyone who can send a photo of this type of detector off to me, it would greatly be appreciate

thanks everyone
steve

Offline pantone159

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Re: Pictures of elements above 83 (Po,At,Rn...)
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2008, 02:05:39 PM »
You look for the indication that the detector contains Am-241, as almost all of them do.

Am-241 decays by alpha decay...  into Np-237.  So my detector, which has 0.9 microcuries of Am-241, is generating 33,300 atoms of Np-237 every second.  Or around a 1e12 atoms a year.  Np-237 is long-lived, so almost all of it sticks around.

This isn't a visible amount, of course, the Am-241 isn't visible in the first place.

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