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Poll

What Computer Algebraic System (CAS) do you use?

Matlab
4 (57.1%)
Maple
2 (28.6%)
Mathematica
1 (14.3%)
GNU Octave
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 5

Topic: Mathematical Computing in Engineering  (Read 10362 times)

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Offline Donaldson Tan

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"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline pantone159

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2006, 12:29:30 PM »
I want to vote for cellulose sheets and graphite sticks.

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2006, 04:41:25 PM »
What other CAS are available?
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline eugenedakin

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2006, 10:46:33 PM »
Hi Geodome,

Chuckle ... I use 'other' .. I have made my own ... Its only taken 6 gruelling years !!!!  And I am still adding to it ...

Sincerely,

Eugene
There are 10 kinds of people in this world: Those who understand binary, and those that do not.

Offline Borek

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2006, 03:52:27 AM »
DOS version of Derive - just because I happen to have a legal version :) Sometimes I am borrowing TI89 from Junior.

But then my needs are rather low atm, occasional derivative here and there. In most cases paper/pencil (s*.*, they are going to ban graphite!) is enough.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2006, 06:02:36 AM by Borek »
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Offline Albert

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2006, 08:32:41 AM »
I voted for Mathematica.
It has to be said, anyhow, that I used only when I was preparing for my Maths exam (3 years ago). ::)

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2006, 08:53:18 AM »
I use Maple for a lot of stuff, such as process simulation and reactor design. There is no way I can solve the differential equations analytically or numerically in a short time. Fortunately, we have the computer to do all these tedious stuff for us. LOL.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline Unsichtbar

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2006, 02:47:31 PM »
Sometimes I use Matlab above all I work with based-equation process simulator like gPROMS (General Process Modelling System) (http://www.psenterprise.com/gproms).
In my projects I use the based-equation simulator that's been developed for our research group: EMSO (Environment for Modeling, Simulation and Optimization) (http://vrtech.com.br/rps/emso.html).
Reference:
Soares, R. de P., Secchi, A.R. (2003). EMSO: A New Environment for Modelling, Simulation and Optimisation, ESCAPE-13.

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2006, 02:49:20 PM »
... I work with based-equation process simulator like gPROMS (General Process Modelling System) (http://www.psenterprise.com/gproms).

LOL. gPROMS is developed in-house at Imperial College. PSE Enterprise is an Imperial College Spin-off from the Chemical Engineering Department.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2006, 02:55:01 PM by geodome »
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline Unsichtbar

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2006, 02:52:27 PM »
What other CAS are available?

Polymath (http://www.polymath-software.com)

It's used by Fogler in your CRE book.

Offline Unsichtbar

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2006, 08:51:40 AM »
... I work with based-equation process simulator like gPROMS (General Process Modelling System) (http://www.psenterprise.com/gproms).

LOL. gPROMS is developed in-house at Imperial College. PSE Enterprise is an Imperial College Spin-off from the Chemical Engineering Department.

LOL. gPROMS is fantastic.  :D
Our simulator pretends to have features of gPROMS (to edit and create models) and Aspen (to build flowsheet graphically) and other functionalities.

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: Mathematical Computing in Engineering
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2006, 06:22:17 PM »
Actually,the people at PSE Enterprise are the same people (PhD students, post doc and professors) at the Process System Engineering Centre of the Chemical Engineering Department at Imperial College.

The PhD students get their PhD by writing a gPROM module, plus other academic stuff and doing industrial research on Process Modelling and Control. I am studying my undergraduate degree now at Imperial College.

The original gPROMs was written to improve the functions and add more features to Aspen 1.0. gPROMS then was a pet project of one of the Professors of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College.  When Aspen 2.0 was released, the gPROMs code was ported over to support Aspen 2.0 and furthur more features were added. By the time Aspen v4.0 was released, gPROMs was powerful enough that it does not need a new version of Aspen to better it. Instead, Aspen 2.0 was acquired by the university (Imperial College) so that the university has a full ownership to entire gPROMs package, ie. gPROMs module and the Aspen 2.0 core.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

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